Jan 24, 2021  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2020-2021 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2020-2021

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    ELEC 282 - Patterning for Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is a hands-on treatment of all aspects of advanced pattern transfer and pattern transfer equipment including probe techniques; stamping and embossing; e-beam; and optical contact and stepper systems. The course is divided into five major sections. The first section is an overview of all pattern generation processes covering aspects from substrate preparation to tool operation. The second section concentrates on photolithography and examines such topics as mask template, and mold generation. Chemical makeup of resists will be discussed including polymers, solvents, sensitizers, and additives. The role or dyes and antireflective coatings will be discussed. In addition, critical dimension (CD) control and profile control of resists will be investigated. The third section will discuss the particle beam lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography. The fourth section covers probe pattern generation and the fifth section explores embossing lithography, step-and-flash, stamp lithography, and self assembled lithography.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 274.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 272, ELEC 273.
  
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    ELEC 283 - Materials Modification in Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course will cover in detail the processing techniques and specialty hardware used in modifying properties in nanofabrication. Material modification steps to be covered will include etching, functionalization, alloying, stress control and doping. Avoiding unintentional materials modification will also be covered including such topics as use of diffusion barriers, encapsulation, electromigration control, corrosion control, wettability, stress control, and adhesion. Hands-on materials modification and subsequent characterization will be undertaken.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 284.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 274, ELEC 282.
  
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    ELEC 284 - Characterization, Testing of Nanotechnology Structures and Materials


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course examines a variety of techniques and measurements essential for testing and for controlling material fabrication and final device performance. Characterization includes electrical, optical, physical, and chemical approaches. The characterization experience will include hands-on use of tools such as the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), fluorescence microscopes, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 283.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 274, ELEC 282.
  
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    ELEC 290 - Practicum for Technologies


    2 credits (200 work hours per semester)
    A supervised work experience designed to allow the student to grow professionally, to identify strengths and weaknesses, to apply learned theory to practical situations, and to gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and sophomore standing.
  
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    ELEC 291 - Linear Circuit Analysis


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This relatively theoretically oriented course introduces linear circuit analysis techniques for circuits containing dependent sources. Function-oriented signal analysis, La Place transform applications, the complex frequency domain, pole-zero analysis, and system transfer functions are heavily stressed. Computer aided circuit analysis and design using PSpice is included.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222 or PHYS 222 or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMST 102 - Emergency Medical Technician Certification Prep


    6 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab, plus 16 patient contact hours)
    This course will provide basic training in all aspects of emergency medical care that an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) is permitted to provide throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This course will follow the current National Education Standard for the Emergency Medical Technician. Upon successfully meeting the completion criteria, the student will be eligible to take the psychomotor and cognitive examinations as offered through the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. Successful completion of the exams is not guaranteed. Students must maintain a 70% cumulative grade throughout class and examinations to meet national registry standards for certification testing. Child abuse, FBI fingerprint, and criminal history clearances are necessary.
    Prerequisite(s): AHEA 280, AHEA 125, AHEA 110, and PSYC 201
  
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    EMST 200 - EMS Practicum


    2 credits (1 lecture, 8 work hours per week)
    This is a supervised EMS work experience designed to allow the student to grow professionally, identify strengths and weaknesses, and apply learned theory to practical situations. The student will gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career.
    Prerequisite(s): EMT Certification and ENGL 101 or ENGL 110.
  
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    ENGL 029 - Developmental Reading


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is designed for students requiring in-depth reading skill development and review. Its focus is intensive practice and reinforcement of essential comprehension and retention skills. The student will review vocabulary, study and test-taking strategies, and summation techniques. 
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 029 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 030 - Preparatory Reading


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for students requiring reading skill development and review. Reading skills will be strengthened and new comprehension and retention strategies will be taught. The student will review vocabulary, study and test-taking strategies, and summation techniques. 
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 030 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 031 - Reading, Writing, and Reasoning


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    The course is designed for students requiring skill review/support for success in English 101. It is an integrated study of reading strategies and college-level composition skills.
    Corerequisite(s): ENGL 101 with same instructor based on placement test scores
  
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    ENGL 034 - Developmental English


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is designed for the student requiring in-depth skill review, emphasizing the writing process and sentence-level competencies. In preparation for English I, the student will engage in intensive study of grammar, sentence construction, punctuation, and paragraph/essay development within various contexts, including his/her individual writing.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 034 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 035 - Preparatory English


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is designed for students requiring skill review in preparation for English I. Emphasis is placed upon the overall writing process: pre-writing, writing, rewriting. The student will study grammar, sentence construction, spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary within the context of individual writing.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 035 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 101 - College Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course stresses the writing process of planning, organizing, drafting, revising, and editing multiple-paragraph essays. Methods of invention, types of development, and the mechanics of effective academic composition are included as well as discussion of plagiarism and source documentation. This course meets the General Education competencies of Information Literacy (IL) and Written Communication (WC).
    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on college placement test or completion of ENGL 034 or ENGL 035 and/or completion of ENGL 029 or ENGL 030.
  
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    ENGL 102 - Research Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The emphasis of this course is upon persuasion, evaluation, research and writing the research paper.  There will be a continuation of careful editing of grammar and sentences. Students will continue the study and writing of thoughtful and organized expositions.  This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 104 - Research Writing with Literature


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The emphasis of this course is upon literary analysis, focused on the standard literary genres and on the process of writing a research paper on a literary topic. Students will continue the study of writing thoughtful and organized expositions as well as careful editing of grammar and sentences. This course meets the General Education competencies of Critical Thinking (CT) and Technological Competence (TC). .
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 110 - Technical Writing I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will emphasize the preparation, review, and revision of the written and oral communication formats typical of the workplace. This course will also provide an introduction to the uses of electronic and visual communications used in workplace settings.  This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on College placement test or completion of ENGL 034 or ENGL 035 and/or completion of ENGL 029 or ENGL 030.
  
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    ENGL 111 - Technical Writing II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of preparing, reviewing, revising, and finalizing workplace and technical communication with emphasis on the practice and study of selected types of discourse employed in professional writing situations.  Examples from the writing of workplace professionals are analyzed and used as models to demonstrate the transition from academic to professional writing.  This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or ENGL 110.
  
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    ENGL 145 - Creative Writing Workshop


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course will serve as an introduction to the writing of original poetry and short fiction.  Instruction in literary techniques will direct the student’s writing.  In addition to working within literary conventions to produce manuscripts, students will be exposed to exemplary texts by selected authors. Students will learn to critique their own work and the work of others by participating in writing workshops.  Students will be introduced to markets for creative writing and will be encouraged to submit work for publication. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 180 - Film Analysis


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course investigates film as an art form in its historic, aesthetic, philosophic, and technical aspects in order to help the student read, appreciate and analyze this contemporary medium of expression.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of professor.
  
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    ENGL 201 - American Literature: Colonial and Romantic


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course the student will read works of representative American authors from colonial times to the Civil War.  The course explores American literature’s diverse aesthetic and cultural traditions. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 203 - Shakespeare


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course includes a study of selected plays of William Shakespeare. Primary focus is placed on texts and performances. Secondary focus is placed on the author’s life and times. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 204 - Modern Drama


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an examination of the development of modern drama as literature from Ibsen to contemporary dramatists. This is not a performance course.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 206 - American Literature: Realistic and Modern


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    A survey of representative American authors from the end of the Civil War to the present, this course explores the continuing genesis and development of American literature’s diverse aesthetic and cultural traditions. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 207 - Classical Mythology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the mythology of classical antiquity with emphasis on recognized masterpieces of literature by authors such as, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 208 - Sports Literature


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a reading-intensive study of representative works that present and explore key cultural, social, political, aesthetic, and philosophical issues related to sports. This course operates on the premise that sports is an integral part of human culture and society. Given this premise, students will contextualize sports within this wider context, as well as clarify sports’ role in both reflecting and generating cultural and social change. Moreover, students will contribute their own insights to on-going conversations about sports and culture through writing and discussions.

     
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101, or permission of the instructor.

  
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    ENGL 209 - English Literature Before 1798


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a survey of the writings of English authors from Anglo-Saxon times to 1798, with the principal emphasis upon recognized masterpieces of literature. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT). Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 210 - 19th & 20th Century English Literature


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a survey of the writing of English authors from 1798 through the 20th Century, with the principal emphasis upon recognized masterpieces of literature. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT). Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 214 - Introduction to Fiction


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course investigates the short story, the novella, and the novel. A variety of selections will be studied to highlight development along with focusing on historic, cultural, structural, psychological, political, philosophic, and linguistic contexts by applying contemporary literary theory to the texts. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 216 - World Literature: Ancient Through Early Modern


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of world literature from the ancient world through the early Renaissance, emphasizing Western and Non-Western literary and cultural traditions.  The course encourages awareness of a global environment through exploration of selected works including poetry, prose, and drama. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 217 - World Literature: Renaissance Through The Present


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Beginning in the Renaissance and progressing through the twentieth century, this course explores both Western and Non-Western literary and cultural traditions.  The course encourages awareness of a global environment through exploration of selected works in various genres including poetry, prose, and drama. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE). Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 220 - Detective Fiction


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course the student will read, discuss, and write about detective stories and novels from the nineteeth century to the present. The three principle types of detectives and genres of detective fiction will be included: amteur sleuths and puzzle stories, private investigators and hardboiled stories, and police investigators and police procedural stories.
    Prerequisite(s): English 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 225 - Introduction to Poetry


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of poetry, from traditional to modern, and its structure, styles, movements, devices, techniques, and interpretations. 
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 230 - Women Authors


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of representative works written by women from numerous historical, social, and literary perspectives. The course is designed to work toward a shared understanding of historical and cultural developments in Women’s Literature from both England and the United States.  The course will also emphasize literary theory when applicable.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    FIRE 101 - Introduction to Fire Sciences


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course provides a history of the fire service in the United States, as its primary focus. Because of the many facets involved in firefighting, the student is encouraged to relate the progress of firefighting from early colonial days, starting with Ben Franklin, through current technology, to future aspects for the fire service.  Fall semester only. 
  
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    FIRE 102 - Introduction to Fire Suppression


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is an introduction to the physical nature of fire behavior. The course will examine the basic reactions that occur to cause ignition of substances. In addition to learning about the nature of burning materials, the student will learn to identify fire hazards. An introduction to fire suppression methods will be included. Fire prevention is also reinforced to the participant. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Fire Science or permission of instructor or dean.
  
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    FIRE 103 - Introduction to Fire Apparatus


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a brief history of the earliest fire units to modern designs. Study of specific uses, new design developments and the requirements for specific apparatus will lead the student to be able to develop specifications for the purchase of fire apparatus. Investigation and examination of components, including chassis, cab, pumps, custom bodywork and aerial devices, will be explored. The student will participate in design specification sessions and will have the opportunity to review features that may be pertinent to particular apparatus or regional idiosyncrasies.  Summer session only. 
    Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Fire Science or permission of instructor or dean.
  
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    FREN 101 - French I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The beginning College French course is a functional one which includes the fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in correct idiomatic French. Selected cultural material is used to enhance basic skills.
  
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    FREN 102 - French II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The beginning College French course is a functional one which includes the fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in correct idiomatic French. Selected cultural material is used to enhance basic skills. The second semester will expand fundamentals and improve proficiency in the rudiments of French.
    Prerequisite(s): One year of high school French, FREN 101, or permission of instructor.
  
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    FREN 201 - French III


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a review of the four basic skills of French through written and oral work. In addition, vocabulary peculiarities and idioms, grammatical problems, and a study of current French events and cultural ramifications are included. Class and individual work will be stressed to achieve greater fluency in comprehension, speaking, and writing.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102 or permission of instructor.
  
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    FREN 202 - French IV


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a review of the four basic skills of French through written and oral work. In addition, vocabulary peculiarities and idioms, grammatical problems, and a study of current French events and cultural ramifications are included. Class and individual work will be stressed to achieve greater fluency in comprehension, speaking, and writing.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 or permission of instructor.
  
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    FSVC 110 - Hospitality Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)

    This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the principles, concepts, and functions of management in a hospitality operation.  It is a study of the overview of the hospitality industry from a profile of its historical development to its three principal areas: the food and beverage segment, the lodging segment, and travel and tourism.  It will provide the student with a clear understanding of career opportunities available within the hospitality industry. Fall semester only.

  
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    FSVC 115 - Commercial Food Analysis


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course uses a practical management approach to the terms, technique and principles of food preparation. Lectures and discussions will concentrate on the development of basic food preparation skills, learning the scientific principles relating to various food handling, the economics and organizational aspects of food preparation and factors affecting the evaluations of different foodstuffs. The principles of food preparation covered in class will be analyzed in a laboratory environment.
  
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    FSVC 120 - Special Events Planning


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The focus of this course is special-events planning with an emphasis on the following: design basics, room configurations, event flow, entertainment, and concessions. Also, communication skills necessary for special-event planning venues including festivals, galas, fairs, sporting events, weddings, and reunions are examined.
  
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    FSVC 121 - Baking Essentials


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course explores the fundamentals of baking and focuses on the ingredients and techniques employed in the production of quality baked goods and dessert specialties. In lab, a variety of baked products are produced utilizing both scratch and convenience techniques. Fall semester only.
  
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    FSVC 126 - Food Safety Certification


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. Attention is focused on food borne illnesses, their origins and on ways to apply sanitary principles in practical situations as well as methods for training employees to follow good sanitation practices. HACCP principles are emphasized. The course meets and exceeds FDA recommendations on content for sanitation. Fall semester only.
  
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    FSVC 127 - Hospitality and Travel Marketing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course covers the marketing and sales techniques specifically related to the hospitality industry including marketing research; the marketing mix; and the role of communication, advertising, promotion, and public relations.
  
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    FSVC 128 - Customer Relations for the Hospitality Industry


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Exceptional customer relations are paramount for success in the foodservice, lodging, and tourism industries. This course is designed to provide students with the basic principles involved in delivering superior guest services. Selected topics include proper service techniques for foodservice establishments, dealing with front desk concerns in lodging, and managing dissatisfied customers within the hospitality environment.
  
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    FSVC 135 - Events Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the exciting field of meetings and events management. The course is taught from the perspective of a meeting planner, event planner, and a facility manager. The relationship between these roles is explored by way of the text, discussion, and guest lecturer(s). Students will plan events throughout the semester to gain experience working with subcontractors, clients, and event staff. Fall semester only. 
  
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    FSVC 140 - Principles of Nutrition


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the principles and practices of basic normal nutrition which contribute to total wellness. Fundamentals include nutrients, digestion, absorption, metabolism, and dietary recommendations. Selected nutrition topics are nutrition over the life cycle; weight management and exercise; nutrition and health; nutrition labeling; menu planning; and developing healthy recipes.
  
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    FSVC 142 - Diet Therapy


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course explores the nutrition care process in healthcare facilities. Topics to be covered include nutritional assessment, computer diet analysis, care plans, calculating diets, planning medical nutrition therapy, enteral feedings’ calculations, documentation, regulations, quality assurance issues, and nutrition counseling methods.
    Prerequisite(s): FSVC 140.
  
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    FSVC 201 - Quantity Food Production


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course introduces students to quantity food equipment and techniques through lecture and demonstration. The student will practice specific recipes based on theories, guidelines, and general procedures applicable to a defined category of foods and/or cooking methods. Fall semester only.
  
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    FSVC 203 - Food and Beverage Purchasing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is intended to promote an understanding of the managerial aspects of the hospitality purchasing activity.  Emphasis is placed on strategic selection and procurement considerations based on item need, value, and supplier information.  The purchasing targets are food, beverage, supplies, equipment, services, and furnishings.  Particular attention will also be given to product identification and to the receiving, storing, and issuing sequence, as well as to the technological applications and concepts in purchasing.  Spring semester only.
  
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    FSVC 204 - Hospitality Management Practicum


    4/5 credits (1 lecture, 11 work or 1 lecture, 14 work hours per week)
    This course is designed to aid students in applying the skills necessary for success in the hospitality industry by providing actual supervised work experience in the Hospitality Industry under the guidance of a hospitality manager.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 hours in program and 15 hours in the major with a “C” average and/or permission of the instructor.
  
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    FSVC 210 - Hospitality Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a general knowledge of the law as it applies to the hospitality industry. Content includes proactive management strategies to ensure compliance with hospitality laws and regulations. Fall semester only.
  
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    FSVC 211 - Cultural Cuisines Around the World


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Through lectures and demonstrations students become acquainted with the social, cultural, and economic aspects of food preparation including both International and American Regional cuisine. Students will be exposed to several culinary specialties and food customs from the world’s diverse cultures. Spring semester only.
  
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    FSVC 215 - Restaurant and Lodging Operations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to provide a systematic approach to understanding the functions of management and its responsibilities in restaurant and lodging operations. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): FSVC 110 or BUSN 123
  
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    FSVC 220 - Catering Management


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course develops an understanding of the underlying concepts and management skills necessary for the successful operation of a catering service. It provides an orientation to the field of catering including all the activities associated with the sales, organization, food preparation, and service of catered functions. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): FSVC 201 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    FSVC 230 - Hospitality Cost Control and Analysis


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to examine the need for effective controls in foodservice, beverage, human resources, and hotel operations. It includes consideration of how the control process relates to other management systems and how it fits into the overall management of food and beverage operations. Also included is management examination of procedures assuring that performance standards are met, the means for determining actual operating costs, budget development, and labor and food costs controls. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): Business Math (BUSN 121) and Quantity Food Production (FSVC 201)
  
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    GENL 001 - Educational Technology Orientation


    0 credits
    This course is designed to assist students in the transition to online and hybrid learning. Students will be provided with an overview of the general components of the College’s learning management system and will become familiar with the computing knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in an online course. Key concepts include: computing knowledge and skills evaluation, course navigation, accessing course materials, submission of assignments and exams, and the proper use of online communication tools.
  
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    GENL 101 - College Study Skills (CAPS)


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course provides an opportunity for students to explore a variety of issues related to college success. The course will focus on study skills and personal development and will include the following topics: goal setting, campus resources, note-taking, textbook reading, time management, stress management, test preparation, test taking skills and communication skills.
  
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    GENL 110 - College Success Skills


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course, designed to assist students in the transition to college life, will provide strategies for success including study skills, textbook reading techniques, note taking methods, and stress and time management skills. Students will develop career plans through the implementaion of inventories and assessments, as well as utilization of Internet and software applications. Emphasis is placed on the identification of college resources and policies that can assist students in their academic success. 
  
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    GENL 111 - Job Readiness


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course is designed primarily for second year students who are expecting to enter the workforce and intend to improve their ability to find meaningful employment. Job search strategies and their application will be covered. 
    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 12 earned college credits.
  
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    GENL 115 - Career Planning


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course provides information and experiential activities designed to help students narrow their choices for a college major and develop skills necessary for long-range career planning and development. Emphasis will be placed upon assisting students to engage in self-assessment, clarify and formulate realistic career goals, and develop appropriate career plans and strategies to achieve those goals.
  
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    GENL 120 - Financial Literacy


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course, which is relevant for all majors, provides instruction in financial literacy skills associated with personal financial management. This skill-based course stresses personal and financial responsibility, and explores the study of careers, income, money, management, and financial planning in the context of personal financial decision-making.
  
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    GENL 201 - Presidential Scholars Project Preparation


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course is preparation for the completion of the Presidential Scholars Project. The Presidential Scholars Project is a student-centered learning activity providing an opportunity for a deeper understanding of a specific area or topic.
    Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the Presidential Scholars Program and completion of six credits of Scholars designated courses.
  
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    GEOG 101 - World Geography


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines various types of natural environments throughout the world and emphasizes the adjustment of humans to them. The interrelationships between physical and cultural factors are studied. Emphasis is placed on the various geographical regions along with the interactions among cultures and different countries for a global context. This course meets the General Education competencies of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    GRMN 101 - German I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Beginning College German is a functional course which includes fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in correct idiomatic German. Selected cultural material is used to enhance the basic skills.
  
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    HIST 101 - Native Americans


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces students to various Native American cultures throughout the Americas from pre-historic time to the present. Emphasis will be placed on cultural adaptations, reservation life, cross-cultural comparisons and cultural change. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    HIST 122 - Western Civilization I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces western civilization from pre-history to the early Renaissance. Topics include early civilizations, ancient Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the emergence of national monarchies in Western Europe. Analysis of significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early western civilization will be emphasized. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    HIST 123 - Western Civilization II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces western civilization from the Renaissance to the rise of the modern world. Topics include the Reformation, Exploration, the Age of Reason, Imperialism, and the origins of the modern state. The focus will be on the process of modernization, the secularization of western society, and how war and revolution have served to create the modern world. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    HIST 150 - American Involvement in Vietnam


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the events which led to the American involvement in Vietnam as well as the war in Vietnam itself and America’s prolonged withdrawal. The course will also examine the war’s effect on international relations as well as on the home front.
  
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    HIST 151 - Ancient and Medieval World History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces global world history from the origins of the human record to the year 1500 CE. Students will become familiar with the development of, and interactions between, peoples, civilizations, and empires. Topics include the rise of cities, the evolution of technology and migration, the importance of agriculture, the rise and fall of cultures, the changing nature of warfare, and the emergence of religions.
  
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    HIST 152 - Early Modern World History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces global world history from the age of exploration (1500CE) to the early 20th century. Students will become familiar with the development and interactions between peoples, cultures, religions, empires, and nation-states. Topics include the age of exploration, the rise of industrialization, imperialism, the age of revolutions, the expanding global economy, and the causes of the world wars.
  
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    HIST 201 - Early United States History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the history of America from pre-Columbian times to 1877. The class will explore how race, geography, gender, class, and culture created competing worlds in America. Students will analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history before the Reconstruction era. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).

     

  
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    HIST 202 - Recent United States History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course students will explore the social, cultural, and economic, growth of America and the political history shaped by these changes.  Selected topics including ethnic communities will be emphasized. This course meets the General Education competencies of Critical Thinking (CT) and Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    HIST 203 - Introduction to Holocaust Studies


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will explore an introduction in Holocaust studies from early European Anti-Semitism throughout the rise of the Third Reich and the Final Solution including the outcomes and effects resulting from this era. 
  
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    HIST 204 - Introduction to Historical Methods


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course offers students the opportunity to become historical detectives and produce an original scholarly work.  Students will learn to distinguish between evidence and interpretation (primary and secondary sources), work with local materials and organizations, on-line archival materials, and learn how to evaluate other historians’ interpretations of the past. In addition, students will study various historical philosophies, historiography, possible careers, and the skills central for history majors. 
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101
  
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    HIST 205 - Contemporary World History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines major issues of the Twentieth Century such as the causes and consequences of World Wars I and II, the impact of western imperialism on the emergence of Third World nation states, the development of totalitarianism, the conflicts of the Cold War, and the trend towards increasing global interdependence during the 21st century. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    HIST 217 - History of East Asia


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will focus upon the history of East Asia from early 19th century until the present era covering China, Japan, and Korea. Attentio n will be given to the internal developments of China, Japan, and Korea as well as the struggles imposed by the relentless challenges of the Western World. The value systems which shaped Chinese, Japanese, and Korean life will be highlighted.
  
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    HIST 220 - American Civil War


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will explore the causes, path, consequences, and legacy of the American Civil War covering the time frame of the Antebellum Period through Reconstruction. Key political, social, and economic issues will be analyzed as both triggers and developments throughout the duration of the Civil War Era. Fall semester only. 
  
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    HLTH 115 - Human Sexuality


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is designed to survey a broad range of information about human sexuality from biological, psychological, sociological, religious and medical perspectives.  Spring semester only. 
  
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    HLTH 120 - Health Science


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to examine the dimensions of life while providing the knowledge that enables students to make educated decisions that impact the potential for an improved healthy lifestyle. This course will provide current information relative to both personal and community health, emphasizing healthy lifestyle choices day to day and minimizing the risks of disease and injury. This course meets the General Education competencies of Wellness (HW) and Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
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    HLTH 125 - Motor Behavior


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to study the process of human motor behavior across the lifespan, specifically examining how development of mental and motor abilities affects human movement.
  
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    INST 101 - Process Control Instrumentation


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This introductory course will emphasize measuring and monitoring processes. The course will include topics on basic semiconductor application in instrument design, codes and standards (ISA-9000), processes, sensors and transducers, electronic transmitters, signal conditioning and transmission devices, display and control instruments. Basic circuit analyzing, troubleshooting and preventative maintenance will also be covered.  Fall semester only.

     
    Corerequisite(s): MATH 117
    Prerequisite(s): PENG 102 or permission of instructor

  
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    MACH 110 - Introduction to Manufacturing


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides an introduction to the underlying employee skills applied within a typical manufacturing operation in which materials are transformed into useful products.  Hands-on applications will be employed to reinforce key portions of the material covered.
  
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    MACH 111 - Lathe I


    3 credits (1 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is designed to provide the student with basic skills in the use of the metal lathe, its parts and applications. Classroom and laboratory activities will include straight turning, facing, single point threading, turning with stock held in chucks and between centers. Students will turn parts to specification while observing appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: DRFT 114.

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills: Turning Operations–turning chucking skills and turning between centers (Machining Level I Standard).

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 112 - Lathe II


    3 credits (1 lecture, 5 lab)
    This course is continuation of LATHE I. LATHE II exposes the student to advanced complex turning on the lathe. Topics covered will include set ups and turning, internal and external threads, knurling, precision boring, face plates, grinding attachments, steady rests, and follow rests. Students will turn parts to specification using appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites:  MACH 111 and MACH 117 or MATH 117.

    This course can be completed by obtaining National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Machining Level II Standard certification.

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 117 - Applied Machine Shop Mathematics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to meet the needs of metalworking students with an emphasis on application problems. Topics include operations with real numbers, percents, equations, ratio, proportion, trigonometric functions, geometry, use of the calculator, scientific notation, and measurement.
    Prerequisite(s): Pass MATH 090 or MATH 091 with a C or better.
  
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    MACH 121 - Precision Grinding


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the precision surface grinder, its parts, operation, and basic application.  Classroom and laboratory activities include the set up and operation of the surface grinder, wheel selection, surface finishes, and grinding fluids.  Students will grind parts to industrial standards using appropriate safety procedures.

     

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills:  job planning, bench work, and layout and grinding skills (Machining Level I Standard).

    Credit for this course can be granted through verification of the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certifications: Measurement, Materials, and Safety (MMS) and Grinding Level I credentials. 

    Butler County Community College does not offer NIMS certification.

     
    Prerequisite(s): DRFT 114 and MACH 117

  
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    MACH 131 - Mill I


    3 credits (1 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the milling machine, its parts, operation, and application. Classroom and laboratory activities will include the basic setup and operation of the vertical milling machine, its accessories and attachments, speeds and feeds, metal cutting techniques, drilling and reaming. Students will mill parts to specification using appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: DRFT 114.

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills: job planning, bench work, and layout, drill press skills and Milling I (Machining Level I Standard).


    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 132 - Mill II


    3 credits (1 lecture, 5 lab)
    This course is a continuation of MILL I. MILL II exposes the student to complex machining on the vertical mill. Topics covered will include, precision hole location, key seats, rotary tables, dividing head operations, and horizontal boring mill operations.

    Prerequisites:  MACH 131 and MACH 117 or MATH 117.

    This course can be completed by obtaining National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Machining Level II Standard certification.

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

     

  
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    MAST 120 - Medical Laboratory Procedures


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course introduces the student to medical laboratory tests that are conducted in the ambulatory care environment.  The laboratory component of the course stresses specimen collection and processing, performance of selected tests, proper use of quality control methods, analysis of results, and methods of reporting results. The lecture component stresses the understanding of the biological, physical, and chemical principles underlying the testing methods and test results as they relate to health and disease states.
    Prerequisite(s): AHEA 125 or BIOL 115.
  
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    MAST 131 - Clinical Medical Assisting I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental aspects of the role of the professional medical assistant (MA) and the basic clinical skill competencies for the ambulatory care setting.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MA Program
  
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    MAST 132 - Clinical Medical Assisting II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course enables the student to perform clinical skill competencies in the ambulatory care setting, comprehend the basics of pathophysiology, perform safety procedures and identify emergency preparedness practices required for the entry-level medical assistant (MA).
    Prerequisite(s): MAST 131
  
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    MAST 133 - Introduction to Pharmacology


    2 credits (2 lecture)
    This course introduces basic pharmacological principles using a body systems approach; compares and contrasts the classifications of medications; and identifies the desired effects, side effects and adverse reactions of the most commonly prescribed drugs.
    Prerequisite(s): MAST 131 or AHEA 125.
  
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    MAST 271 - Medical Assistant Externship


    4 credits (6 lecture hours, 232 externship hours)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the concepts and skills learned in the Medical Asistant (MA) program at affiliated ambulatory clinics or physician offices.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 24 hours in the program and 12 hours in the major (including MAST 120, MAST 131, MAST 132, and MAST 133) with a “C” or better or with the consent of the Externship Coordinator.
  
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    MATH 090 - Developmental Algebra


    4 institutional credits (4 lecture)
    This course is designed as a review of basic arithmetic operations with decimals and fractions and an introduction to algebra.  Topics include properties of numbers, operations with integers, fractions and decimals, basic percent problems with applications, integers as exponents, solving linear equations, operations and factoring of polynomials, and graphing and construction of linear equations.
    Prerequisite(s): Placement exam.
  
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    MATH 091 - Preparatory Algebra


    3 institutional credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed as a review of basic arithmetic operations with rational numbers and an introduction to algebra.  Topics include properties of numbers, operations with rational numbers, integers as exponents, solving linear equations, applications of linear equations, operations and factoring of polynomials, and graphing and construction of linear equations.
    Prerequisite(s): Placement exam.
  
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    MATH 100 - Intermediate Algebra


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of real numbers and operations with polynomials. Other topics include linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations in two variables, solving equations by factoring, exponents, complex numbers, the quadratic formula, and rational equations.  This course meets the General Education Competency of Quantitative Reasoning (QR).

     
    Prerequisite(s): Pass MATH 090 or MATH 091 with a “C” or better or appropriate score on placement test.

  
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    MATH 101 - College Algebra


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of college algebra. Topics in this course include the real number system, exponents and radicals, relations and functions, linear and quadratic functions, inequalities, complex numbers, theory of equations, systems of equations, and the remainder and factor theorems.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
 

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