Jan 24, 2021  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2020-2021 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2020-2021

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    PKMT 101 - Forestry


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides the student with a general understanding of forestry and forest management. Emphasis is on tree identification, basic forest management, silvicultural techniques, forest measurements, map and compass, and global positioning systems. PA 130 - Basic Wildland Firefighter and Project Learning Tree training are components of the course.  Fall semester only. 
  
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    PKMT 102 - Recreation Leadership


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of group dynamics in park and recreation management. The emphasis is on the application of group process principles, leadership development, factors influencing team dynamics, and interpersonal skills. Students will apply classroom theory by participating in and leading group activities.  Fall semester only.  Field trip required.
  
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    PKMT 104 - Introduction to Parks and Recreation


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides an overview of the history and philosophy of leisure and recreation, with major emphasis on American society. The course examines roles of government as well as private institutions in providing park and recreation opportunities. Students will explore park and recreation careers and identify skills to obtain employment.  Fall semester only. 
  
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    PKMT 105 - Park Safety and Visitor Services


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course instructs students in basic law enforcement and rescue techniques that apply to park and recreation areas. Specific training includes: swiftwater, ice, advanced line systems rescue, patient packaging and transport. Water rescue certifications may be obtained upon successful completion of certification standard requirements.   Field trips and additional class time required. Course meets PA and national program requirements for certification and NFPA 1670 standards.  Spring semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): PKMT 110 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PKMT 110 - First Aid and Safety


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course instructs the student in first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillation (AED) skills. Emphasis will be towards stabilization of emergency situations by providing basic life support until advanced life support arrives. Upon successful completion of certification requirements, students will be certified in Emergency Response and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. Meets Guidelines 2000 for Emergency Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Spring semester only. 
  
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    PKMT 201 - Park Management Practicum


    2 credits (1 lecture, 8 work hours per week)
    This is a supervised work experience designed to allow the student to grow professionally, identify strengths and weaknesses, and apply learned theory to practical situations. The student will gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career.
    Prerequisite(s): PKMT 104.
  
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    PKMT 205 - Interpretive Methods & Programming


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to take the student through the process of developing, creating and presenting interpretive programs. The student will learn how to write lesson plans, operate audiovisual equipment, utilize digital presentation technology, design and construct bulletin boards, and develop an interpretive trail brochure.  Spring semester only.  Field trips are required.
  
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    PKMT 209 - Wildlife Management


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course introduces the concepts involved in the management of wildlife and their related habitat. The student will learn to recognize problems and develop management solutions relevant to maintaining a desirable wildlife population in the Northeastern United States. Project Wild training is also a component of this course.  Fall semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 or BIOL 103.
  
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    PKMT 212 - Park and Recreation Administration


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses on management as a professional discipline within an organization. The study of management theories, organizational structure, agency policies, human resource management, fiscal management, information systems, and risk management are course components. Current management issues and trends will be explored as they relate to the workplace of today.  Fall semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): PKMT 104 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PKMT 230 - Outdoor Adventure Program Management


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides a foundation for students to develop, design and implement an outdoor adventure program. Course emphasis will include: logistical planning, environmental ethics, equipment and clothing selection, group dynamics and leadership, basic outdoor skills, staffing, supervision of staff, staff training, marketing, risk management and safety.  Spring semester only. 
  
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    POLI 210 - American National Government


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of the basic process of National Government: the Congress, the President, and the Judiciary. Other topics covered include federalism, political parties, elections, interest groups, civil liberties, and public policy.
  
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    PSYC 201 - General Psychology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and methodology of psychology. The course is an introduction to the scientific study of behavior. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
  
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    PSYC 202 - Educational Psychology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to introduce psychological principles applied to teaching and learning.  Learning, development, and motivation theory along with learning processes, intellectual functioning, and educational achievement are examined.  The learning environment, instructional planning, classroom management, and assessment are explored. Student diversity and learners with exceptionalities are also discussed, along with the contributions of educational research in today’s changing classrooms. Students must conduct a minimum of five hours of observation in an educationally focused setting and reflect upon their experiences.
  
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    PSYC 203 - Human Growth and Development


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Tracing the physical, social, intellectual, and emotional development of the human organism from birth through adulthood, the course emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of biological maturation and experience in shaping the human personality.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 204 - Abnormal Psychology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the concept of abnormal behavior. The focus is on recognition of maladjustments from mild disorders to severe illnesses, with a survey of major current approaches to therapy.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 208 - Health Psychology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides an introduction to the major topics in the current field of Health Psychology. Emphasis will be placed on the biopsychosocial factors involved in health-enhancing and health-compromising behaviors.
  
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    PSYC 210 - Psychological and Sociological Bases of Sport


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the relationships between sport and various psychological and sociological factors. The psychological emphasis is placed on the micro or individual level. The sociological emphasis is placed on the macro level.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 220 - Psychology of Human Relationships


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed as a lecture and small group learning experience. Emphasis is placed on understanding and applying the theoretical principles which foster functional personal and professional relationships.
  
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    PSYC 223 - Social Psychology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course offers a degree of insight into the ways in which people perceive, comprehend, and interpret the social world. This course will focus on the psychological processes people have in common that make them susceptible to social influence.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSYC 230 - Introduction to Behavioral Science Research


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This project-based course introduces students to research methods and design used in the behavioral sciences. The course prepares students to evaluate published reports of research and to design and to conduct research studies. Specific topics include the nature of psychology as a science, fundamental research issues, the preparation of research proposals and papers, and ethics in behavioral research. 
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101, PSYC 201, MATH 107
  
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    PSYC 242 - Understanding Children’s Play


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the fundamental importance of play. Emphasis is on understanding the complex, organizing purpose of play. The course takes a broad approach to examining how and why children play. Specific topics include theories of play, play in the context of technology, the therapeutic use of play, and play in cultural contexts.
  
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    PSYC 245 - Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Using a developmental psychopathology framework, this course examines the symptoms, causes, and treatments of disorders of children and adolescents and their occurrence along multiple domains. A broad overview of the field of developmental psychology is presented followed by an examination of the major disorders of childhood and adolescence.  The biopsychosocial context of youth development are addressed.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.
  
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    PTAP 101 - Seminar I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course defines the role of the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) as a member of the health care team and provides an overview of the health care delivery system. Topics covered will include: the purpose and benefits of the professional association, types of patients treated, practice settings, documentation of patient records, common medical terminology, the state practice act, malpractice and risk management.
  
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    PTAP 105 - Seminar II


    2 credits (2 lecture)
    This course provides an overview of fiscal considerations for Physical Therapist Assistant, accreditation agencies, quality improvement, human resources, the historical development of Physical Therapy professions, and Standards of Ethical Conduct. Contemporary issues affecting Physical Therapy will be included. This is the final class of the Physical Therapist Assistant Program and will prepare the student for employment after graduation.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 124.
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 101 and PTAP 123.
  
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    PTAP 109 - Patient Practitioner Interaction


    1 credits (1 lecture) First 11 weeks
    This course focuses on communication skills for students studying healthcare. It will complement previous healthcare coursework and will enhance their self-understanding in their roles as healthcare practitioners. The students will learn effective communication across the lifespan as well as learning cultural awareness and sensitivity. Enrollment is limited to students enrolled in a health career program, with permission of the course instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 101 and PTAP 122.
  
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    PTAP 121 - Procedures I


    4 credits (2 lecture, 4 lab)
    The first of four sequential courses addresses general skills such as body mechanics, infection control, gait and functional training, and therapeutic modalities including heat, cold, compression, massage, ultrasound, and electromagnetic modalities. Students will be introduced to identifying patients’ status regarding architectural barriers, environmental modifications, skin integrity and sensation, and vital signs.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 101, PTAP 135, and BIOL 131.
  
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    PTAP 122 - Procedures II


    5 credits (2 lecture, 6 lab)
    The second of four sequential courses, this course focuses on the patient with orthopedic pathology. Students will learn assessment of muscle and joint function, orthopedic pathologies, and treatment intervention for each major body segment. Electrotherapeutic modalities, electrical stimulation and biofeedback, will also be included.
    Corerequisite(s): BIOL 132.
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 101, PTAP 135, and PTAP 121.
  
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    PTAP 123 - Procedures III


    5 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab) First 11 weeks
    The third of four sequential courses, this class will cover adult neurorehabilitation and prosthetics. Assessment and treatment activities for stroke (CVA), brain injury, spinal cord injury, and other nervous system pathologies will be covered, as well as prosthetic rehabilitation. An introduction to evidence-based practice will be included.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 230.
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 122.
  
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    PTAP 124 - Procedures IV


    5 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab) First 7 weeks
    This course is the fourth of four sequential courses. Topics will include wound care, orthoses, cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, pediatrics, geriatrics, and women’s health topics.  Also included will be a continuation of evidence-based practice.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 105.
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 123 and PTAP 230.
  
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    PTAP 135 - Fundamentals of Therapeutic Exercise


    2 credits (2 lecture)
    The basic principles of therapeutic exercise will be presented. The students will learn fundamentals of kinesiology and biomechanics and relate them to the musculoskeletal structures of the human body. Both normal and pathologic states will be covered. Students will also learn the types, effects, and modulations of therapeutic exercises and activities, including stretching,  strengthening, and aerobic conditioning.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 101, PTAP 121, and BIOL 131 or permission from the instructor.
  
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    PTAP 140 - Functional Anatomy


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This class is an in-depth study of the musculoskeletal system, with particular attention paid to kinesiology, peripheral innervation, and surface assessment. The class will also cover posture and gait. Motion of the human body is studied as a basis for the recognition of abnormal movement and the potential development of musculoskeletal pathologies.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 122, BIOL 132, or permission from the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 131, PTAP 135, and PTAP 121.
  
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    PTAP 201 - Clinical Education I


    4 credits (200 clinical hours) 5 weeks
    The first of three clinical experiences, this is an introductory clinical experience which will broaden the student’s perception and understanding of his/her role as a Physical Therapist Assistant. It is an early opportunity for the student to apply his/her current knowledge base under the supervision of the Physical Therapy Clinical Instructor. The duration is 200 hours (generally five 40- hour work weeks).
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 101, PTAP 122, and BIOL 132.
  
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    PTAP 202 - Clinical Education II


    4 credits (200 clinical hours) Last 5 weeks
    This is the second of three clinical experiences. This educational experience builds and integrates communication, technical, and critical-thinking skills developed during additional coursework and Clinical Education I. It will take place in a different type of clinical setting than Clinical Education I. The student will continue to broaden his/her skills as a Physical Therapist Assistant. The duration is 200 hours (generally five 40-hour weeks).
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 101, PTAP 109, PTAP 123, PTAP 201, and PTAP 230.
  
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    PTAP 203 - Clinical Education III


    6 credits (300 clinical hours) Last 8 weeks
    This is the final clinical education experience, which builds on skills developed throughout the Physical Therapist Assistant Program and during Clinical Education I and II. It occurs in a different type of clinical setting than Clinical Educations I and II. Clinical Education III enables the student to integrate all areas of didactic and laboratory practice into clinical practice. The student will be able to integrate his/her health care delivery skills and become an integral member of the health care team. The duration is 300 hours (generally eight 40-hour weeks).
    Prerequisite(s): PTAP 105, PTAP 124, and PTAP 202.
  
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    PTAP 230 - Pathophysiology


    4 credits (4 lecture) First 11 weeks
    This course provides an overview and introduction to the pathophysiology of human disease. It will enable the student to recognize signs and symptoms of disease. Both medical and Physical Therapy interventions and considerations will be addressed. Enrollment is open to non-Physical Therapy Assistant students with permission of the course instructor.
    Corerequisite(s): PTAP 123 or permission from the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 132, PTAP 101, and PTAP 122.
  
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    SOCI 211 - Principles of Sociology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This courses is an orientation to the field of sociology dealing generally with our social institutions and their functions.
  
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    SOCI 212 - Contemporary Social Problems


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course investigates pressing social issues and alternative solutions offered for their alleviation. Selected problems like suicide, environmental abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases such as AIDS will be discussed.
  
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    SOCI 215 - Introduction to Gender Studies


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines contemporary gender relations. Roles and social expectations of boys, girls, men, women, and non-binary individuals within the broader context of “gender” are assessed. It will explore how gender and diversity shape lives within private and public spheres. Topics include class, disability, race, and sexuality.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOCW 101 - Introduction to Social Work


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides students with an introductory understanding of generalist practice social work. Students will examine the history of social work, the core values and ethical principles of the field, and various areas of social work practice. The course explores social service delivery networks and the field’s commitment to realizing social justice. All students in this class must complete 30 hours of service learning. Clearances may be required by service learning site(s). This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE). 

    Prerequisite/Co-requisite: ENGL 101

  
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    SOCW 102 - Human Diversity


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines human differences, providing students with the knowledge and values of culturally competent social work at the introductory-level.  Students will learn about the mechanisms of oppressions, prejudice, and discrimination.  They will recognize the many histories and cultures that exist and how they promote strength and well-being in diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
    Corerequisite(s): ENGL 101
  
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    SOCW 103 - Family Violence Across the Lifespan


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to give students an overview of theory and current research in the area of family violence. Topics to be covered include physical and sexual abuse of children, child neglect, sibling abuse, spousal abuse, rape, elder abuse, abuse in gay and lesbian communities, and abuse of people with disabilities. In addition this course will examine how social service systems, including social work, education, medical professionals, and the criminal justice system are working to reduce the effects of the problem of family violence in our society.
  
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    SOCW 104 - Child Welfare


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses on the characteristics, strengths and service needs of families and children in the child welfare system. It examines and builds policy and practice skills related to family preservation services, child maltreatment, substitute care and permanency planning. The course considers family events within an ecological systems approach and works to build appreciation and sensitivity to various family forms and cultural patterns. 

     

  
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    SOCW 105 - Addictions


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an overview of historical and current definitions of chemical dependency, alcohol abuse, and process addictions. The effects of addiction on behavior, health, development, family, special populations and society will be discussed. The course will examine the scope of the problem, the nature of addictions, the cause and progression of the disease of addiction. The role of the social work profession in assessment, treatment, and prevention of addictions will be addressed. 
    Co-requisite or pre-requisite: SOCW 101
  
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    SOCW 106 - Social Welfare History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces social policy making in the United States. The course examines the history of events and ideas that have shaped American social welfare policy from the colonial period to the present. An examination of social values, economic trends, and criminal justice decisions helps students develop an understanding of the role of the social work profession in social policy development.
  
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    SOCW 107 - Introduction to Aging


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides students with an overview and better understanding of the aging process from a multidisciplinary perspective by studying theories of aging, stereotypes about aging and older adults, changes in physical health, cognition, and communal relationships. Students will examine changes in familial and social roles in the elderly and identify political and social influences on these changes.
  
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    SOCW 201 - Social Work Processes


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course assists students in becoming competent and effective social work interviewers by teaching them specific skills. In this course, students will learn and practice the full range of communication skills necessary for beginning social work practice and use in systems of all sizes. This course addresses the purposes of communication, the principles of effective communication, and the role of the social worker in effective communication. 
    Prerequisite(s): SOCW 101 and 102
  
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    SOCW 202 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the normal processes of development from conception through adulthood, applying theory that is compatible with the Social Systems framework of social work education. The course serves to promote understanding of the relationship between human behavior and the social environment. It examines the factors that shape behavior and the implications of these factors for social work practice. 
    Prerequisite(s): SOCW 101.
  
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    SOCW 215 - Introduction to Addiction Counseling


    3 credits
    This course provides an in-depth look at counseling techniques considered most effective in the treatment of addictive disorders. Students will study theory and knowledge of treatment practices, including the following topics: working relationships, stages of change, treatment modalities, case management, intervention techniques, assessment, and placement. 
    Prerequisite(s): SOCW 101, SOCW 105
  
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    SOCW 216 - Motivational Interviewing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course assists students in becoming counselors by teaching them beginning Motivational Interviewing skills.  In this course, students will learn and practice the full range of communication skills necessary for beginning use of Motivational Interviewing in systems of all sizes.  This course addresses the purposes and principles of Motivational Interviewing and the role of the treatment provider in effectively entering clients into the change process. 
    Prerequisite(s): SOCW 101, SOCW 105
  
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    SOCW 217 - Addictions Practicum


    6 credits (2 lecture, 10 work hours per week)
    This course affords students the ability to practice and apply the concepts they have learned in their Addictions Recovery Specialist coursework.  Students will complete a minimum of 70 hours of field-based experience in a variety of clinical environments addressing addictions recovery. This course requires attendance at a weekly classroom seminar.
    Prerequisite(s): SOCW 101, SOCW 105
  
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    SPAN 101 - Spanish I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This is a functional course which includes the fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading and writing in correct and idiomatic Spanish. Selected cultural material will be used to enhance the basic skills.
  
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    SPAN 102 - Spanish II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This is a functional course which includes the fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading and writing in correct and idiomatic Spanish. Selected cultural material will be used to enhance the basic skills. The second semester will expand upon the fundamentals of Spanish and improve proficiency.
    Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of high school Spanish, SPAN 101, or consent of instructor.
  
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    SPAN 201 - Spanish III


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    These courses are a review of the four language fundamentals through both oral and written patterns, drills, and tests. Included in the course will be the study of vocabulary peculiarities and idioms, syntax review with stress on problems in grammar, guided compositions and creative work both oral and written, and an introduction to Spanish and Latin American literature from the twelfth century to the present.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): SPAN 102.
  
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    SPAN 202 - Spanish IV


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    These courses are a review of the four language fundamentals through both oral and written patterns, drills, and tests. Included in the course will be the study of vocabulary peculiarities and idioms, syntax review with stress on problems in grammar, guided compositions and creative work both oral and written, and an introduction to Spanish and Latin American literature from the twelfth century to the present.  Spring semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): SPAN 201.
  
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    TECH 120 - Load Calculations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a comprehensive study of the fundamentals of heat loss and gain calculations. The student will analyze environmental conditions, load factors, construction materials, and psychometric characteristics. Load calculations will be performed using the Right J for Windows computer software.  Spring semester only.
  
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    TECH 220 - HVAC System Design


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course will provide students with the knowledge of heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC), and duct system design. It explores layout and sizing of equipment, computation of cost, and job estimation.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): TECH 120.
 

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