Nov 25, 2020  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2020-2021 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2020-2021

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    COMM 205 - Video Media


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces students to advanced video production concepts and skills. Multi-camera operations, chroma key, and basic visual effects are explored via lecture and hands-on assignments.
    Corerequisite(s): COMM 203, Interactive Electronic Media.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 103, Electronic Generated Imaging
  
  •  

    COMM 210 - Small Group Communication


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an examination of the small group as a dynamic system. Using exercises and role playing, it analyzes the roles and interactions of group members, providing a basic under-standing of what makes an effective group. Spring semester only.
  
  •  

    COMM 212 - Electronic Layout and Design II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this advanced electronic layout and design class, the student will build on the skills learned in the previous class with the addition of developing and importing art. The students will also learn what printers require of electronic files when submitting them for printing. Fall semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 112 with a “C” grade or higher.
  
  •  

    COMM 214 - Introduction to Graphic Arts Production


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course, students will apply their knowledge of layout and design to professional production practices, including printing processes, binding techniques, and best practices within a commercial environment. This course will advance their knowledge of visual hierarchy, layout design, and user experience.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110 and COMM 112.
  
  •  

    COMM 215 - Intercultural Communication


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the students to the communication patterns within various cultural groups and the breakdowns which occur as members of one cultural group interact with those of another cultural group.  It focuses on the skills and knowledge necessary for effective intercultural communication. This course meets the General Education competency of Values, Ethics, and Diverse Perspectives (VE).
  
  •  

    COMM 216 - Visual Communications Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces visual communications students to the legal requirements for today’s visual communications for their own protection and that of their clients. The course will include copyright law for legally protecting the original visual work of the designer, contracts, releases, and emerging legalities.
  
  •  

    COMM 217 - Applied Media Art and Illustration


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This is a multi-media course intended to expose the student to as many different drawing tools and materials as are available to the graphic designer. It is also designed to introduce the student to the discipline of design art and illustration, in which he/she will learn perspective, responsive drawing and principles of design composition including the use of line, texture, color, and space.
  
  •  

    COMM 218 - Introduction to Computer Animation


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Computer Animation is extensively used in the world of visual communications. From an animated advertisement to the boardroom, computer animation occurs frequently throughout the visual day. Computer animation is the favored medium of a number of highly trained electronic artists. This course is designed to introduce the Graphic Design student to the principles of computer animation, as well as to aid in the integration of the principles of graphic design with those of the electronic art medium. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 210, COMM 110.
  
  •  

    COMM 219 - Advanced SLR Black and White Photography


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to increase photographic capabilities, darkroom skills, and working knowledge of the different media available to the photographer. Students will have the opportunity to work in a minimum of three different films and three different papers on a minimum of three projects. Access to a 35 mm SLR manual over-ride camera is required.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 114.
  
  •  

    COMM 230 - Public Relations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to discuss the principles and applications utilized in the field of public relations. The theory, history and utilization of public relations, especially in the late 19th and 20th Century America, are explored. Students learn the complexities involved in public relations, enhancing their ability to function in practical roles associated with the field.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMM 233 - Portrait Photography and Lighting


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the photography student to the classical and contemporary methods of subject lighting. Film photography, digital photography, the black & white and hybrid darkroom will be used in this course to edit and perfect photographs. Students will learn techniques for creating portrait images. Studio and outdoor lighting techniques and model posing will be a few of the subjects studied for photographing people of all ages, families, and pet portraits. Professional retouch, color correction, and on-site lighting will be experienced through actual and theoretical situations. A 35 mm film camera and a 35 mm digital camera with interchangeable lenses are required for this course.  Fall semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110, COMM 120, and COMM 219.
  
  •  

    COMM 234 - Outdoor and Wildlife Photography


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces photographic techniques utilized by outdoor and wildlife photographers. Equipment, photographic exposure, composition and safety are among the subjects covered in this course. Students will use both a regular black & white darkroom and a hybrid darkroom. They will be combining both film and digital photography with the use of advanced computer techniques to edit and perfect their photographs. Composing wildlife images, capturing animal behavior, and working with on-site lighting will be experienced through theoretical and actual situations. A film SLR camera and digital SLR camera, both with the capability to change lenses, are required for this course.  Fall semester only. 
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110, COMM 120, and COMM 219.
  
  •  

    COMM 235 - Advertising Photography


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the student to the discipline of advertising photography. Students will learn and practice techniques for creating successful advertising images that meet the requirements of the client in a deadline-based environment. Some of the information to be addressed will be designing and capturing advertising images, manipulating and perfecting photographic images and learning techniques to manage an advertising photography business. A manual and a digital SLR (single lens reflex) camera with interchangeable lenses are required for this course.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 111, COMM 120, COMM 219, COMM 212, and COMM 233.
  
  •  

    COMM 241 - Graphic Designer Web Pages


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this advanced electronic skills class, the student will build on skills learned in their previous classes to create and design a web page with Graphic Design sophistication and flair.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 112 and COMM 110.
  
  •  

    COMM 244 - Electronic Multimedia


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Designed for the advanced graphic design student, this course will build on what the student already knows in photography, electronic art and design, and electronic layout and design. The focus will be on incorporating the available professional grade technology as a means of producing presentation materials.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 202, COMM 111, and COMM 212.
  
  •  

    COMM 290 - Graphic Design - Photography Practicum


    3 credits (12 work hours per week)
    This practicum will provide the student with a practical and disciplined work experience in a field setting. The student will spend a minimum of 12 hours a week (180 hours for the semester) working in a professional setting under the guidance of experienced graphic designers or photographers.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 48 program credit hours, COMM 111 and COMM 212 with a “C” grade or higher; Photography students are also required to complete COMM 233 and COMM 234 with a “C” grade or higher and have approval of program director.
  
  •  

    COMM 291 - Graphic Design Seminar


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This is a comprehensive class in which the student verifies the ability and competency to fill the role of entry-level graphic designer. The semester is devoted to the production of one major project. The student chooses the project and medium. It is to be researched, verified, and produced in a professional manner. The project will be verbally presented in detail to classmates and invited guests. This is the culminating project in the Graphic Design Program. This class will also investigate the different art and typography movements in the history of graphic design.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 202, COMM 111, COMM 212.
  
  •  

    COMP 099 - Preparatory Computer Skills


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for students with little or no computer experience. Its focus is on practice and reinforcement of essential computer skills, particularly Windows file and folder management. An introduction to basic terminology, software applications, e-mail, and the College’s current Learning Management System (LMS) will also be covered.
  
  •  

    COMP 101 - Computer Information Systems


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to teach students the basics of computers and information systems. The course emphasizes technological advances of the computer, communications and consumer electronics industries generated through the exchange of information in the digital format used by computers.
  
  •  

    COMP 121 - Introduction to Computer Applications


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will introduce students to computer applications.  Topics will include the College’s current Learning Management System (LMS), email, office applications with emphasis on Microsoft Word®, PowerPoint®, Excel® and Outlook®, Windows® file management, and search engines.  This course meets the General Education competency of Technological Competence (TC).
  
  •  

    COMP 208 - Computer Ethics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is an introduction to ethics as it relates to information technology.  Students will be introduced to the foundations of ethical theory and how ethics is applicable to various topics in information technology including privacy, freedom of speech, intellectual property, security, and employment.
  
  •  

    COMP 210 - Productivity Applications


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to foster computer literacy. It introduces students to the basics of computing hardware, electronic communication, web browsing, and productivity software. Through a hands-on approach, students will achieve a working knowledge of Windows operating system software and word processing, electronic spreadsheet, presentation, and database application software.  This course meets the General Education competency of Technological Competence (TC).
    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on Reading placement test or “C” or better in either ENGL 029 (Developmental Reading) or ENGL 030 (Preparatory Reading).
  
  •  

    COMP 211 - Networking I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a general introduction to networking for network administrators and any system support technicians working on a network.  Special emphasis will be placed on the Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) model and how packets traverse a network.  This course is intended to prepare students to study for and pass the TestOut® Network Pro Certification Exam and/or the CompTIA® Network+ Certification Exam. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 101.
  
  •  

    COMP 212 - Android Mobile Device Programming


    3 credits (3 Lecture)
    This course introduces the development of applications that work on mobile devices. Students will become familiar with the principles of good user interface design and efficient coding practices for mobile devices. Students are expected to have significant prior programming experience. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 236 or COMP 238.
  
  •  

    COMP 214 - Windows Server Administrator


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to prepare a student to become a network or server technician or manager who is able to install and manage Windows Workstation or Windows Server. It will also help to prepare those students interested in certification as a Microsoft Windows Server Product Specialist or Systems Engineer for the certification exam. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 211.
  
  •  

    COMP 215 - PC Management Techniques I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course continues with computing skills and concepts that were learned in COMP 101. Special attention is given to Windows configuration and optimization, Random Access Memory (RAM)  management, system trouble shooting, installing disk drives and installing system components.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 101.
  
  •  

    COMP 216 - PC Management Techniques II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course continues with computer skills and concepts that were learned in COMP 215 (PC Management Techniques I). Special attention is given to troubleshooting common laptop hardware and software problems, replacing common laptop hardware, troubleshooting common networking issues with desktops and laptops, and troubleshooting common printing issues with desktops and laptops. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 215.
  
  •  

    COMP 228 - Computer Science Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    This course is a practicum for advanced students in the Computer Information Systems program. The instructor and immediate supervisor cooperatively supervise projects or work in business organizations. Students will gain experience in the computer field by observing and working with software, hardware, networking, programming, web pages, and/or databases. Students will complete a minimum of 165 hours at the assigned site.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 credits in the program and 18 credits in the major with a “C” average or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 229 - Database Systems


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course covers the definitions and models of database management systems (DBMS) including advanced topics in the theory and practice of applying database technology to the solution of typical business problems. Topics include database design and implementation based on a thorough analysis of requirements and information modeling and the application of Structured Query Language (SQL) to data definition and manipulation. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 210 or COMP 237 or COMP 242 or OADM 135 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 230 - Programming in C++ for Engineers and Scientists


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for science and engineering students and covers structured programming principles using the C++ programming language. It concentrates on the principles of good software engineering and stresses program clarity through the use of a structured top-down methodology. Fall semester only. This course meets the General Education competency of Technological Competence (TC).
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 231 - Visual Programming


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course teaches the concepts of computer programming in a visual environment. Topics to be covered will include the incorporation of programming syntax and logic within Graphical User Interface (GUI) applications; coverage of file access methods; and accessing database management systems interface. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 230 or COMP 235 or COMP 237 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 233 - Data Structures and Algorithms


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This third-level programming course covers the analysis of data structures (arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, trees, and graphs) and their algorithms. The analysis of the time and space requirements will provide a rational basis for the selection of the appropriate data structures and algorithms for programming applications. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 238 and MATH 100 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 235 - Introduction to Web Programming


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the development and management of web pages using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). Topics to be covered will include design principles, search engine optimization (SEO), current HTML and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) syntax, and simple JavaScript. Fall semester only.

     

  
  •  

    COMP 236 - Advanced Web Programming


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course extends the development and management of web pages using dynamic web programming techniques, including the document object model (DOM), client-side (JavaScript, jQuery), server-side (PHP) and database processing.  Emphasis will be placed on current client-side and server-side languages. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 235 and either COMP 231 or COMP 237.
  
  •  

    COMP 237 - Programming Fundamentals


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course covers structured programming principles. It concentrates on the principles of good software engineering and stresses program clarity through the use of a structured top-down methodology. Topics covered include data types, control structures, input/output, functions, string processing, arrays, and basic classes.
    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 based on placement test scores; or C or better in English developmental/preparatory courses. Eligibility for enrollment in MATH 091 based on placement test scores.
  
  •  

    COMP 238 - Object-Oriented Programming


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This second-level course emphasizes the concepts of object-oriented design & programming and includes a thorough conceptual study of encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism in a primary object-oriented programming language. Various implementations of the object-oriented paradigm in other programming languages are also examined along with operator overloading, templates/generics, exception handling and unit testing. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 230 or COMP 237 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 242 - Microcomputing Applications


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course emphasizes an integrated microcomputer applications suite to develop higher-level skills in electronic spreadsheets and database. A common theme will be integrating the various software applications through object linking and embedding. Students will complete numerous hands-on projects to improve their skills.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 210 or successful completion of the exemption test.
  
  •  

    COMP 244 - Microcomputer Operating Systems


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides an overview of operating systems with an emphasis on widely used microcomputer operating systems. The operating systems studied are MS DOS, Windows, Unix/Linux, and MAC OS. Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 242.
  
  •  

    COMP 245 - Web Page Design Tools


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to give students hands-on experience with software applications used to design, enhance and maintain web pages. Students will work with web page development at progressive levels of sophistication, including the beginning text-based; the intermediate graphics-based; and the advanced animation-enhanced levels. Students will work with multiple website development application and content management systems. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: COMP 235 or permisssion of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 246 - Linux


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the installation, configuration and administration of the Linux operating system with an emphasis on the command line operations. Although a specific distribution of Linux will be chosen, the course is primarily vendor neutral and will emphasize topics that also apply to Unix operating systems.  Students successfully completing this course with an A or B should be prepared for the COMPTIA Linux+ Certification Exam.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 101 or COMP 210 or COMP 242.
  
  •  

    COMP 247 - Systems Analysis & Design


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides the student with the core set of skills that are used in the planning, analysis, design and implementation of computer information systems’ architecture, applications, and security. Topics to be covered include: the systems development life cycle, feasibility analysis, systems analysis, requirements gathering, analysis models, design strategies, project management, change management, and post-implementation support and maintenance. Fall semester only. This course meets the General Education competency of Critical Thinking (CT).
    Corerequisite(s): COMP 101.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 210.
  
  •  

    COMP 253 - Client-Side Web Programming


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course extends the development of web sites using client-side scripting languages and libraries to create dynamic web pages to respond to user events and add special effects to enhance the user experience.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 235.
  
  •  

    COMP 254 - Server-Side Web Programming


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course extends the development and management of web sites using server-side web programming languages, server-side programming languages techniques, and database integration.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 253.
  
  •  

    COMP 272 - Web Site Development Specialist Practicum


    3 credits (11 work hours per week)
    This course provides advanced students in the Web Site Development Specialist Degree Program practical hands-on experience by observing and working with the various software applications and programming languages used to develop, enhance, maintain and upload web pages.  The instructor and immediate supervisor cooperatively direct students on projects.  Students will complete a minimum of 165 hours for the practicum experience.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 credits in the program and 18 credits in the major with a “C” average or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    COMP 277 - Cybersecurity I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will provide a comprehensive overview of cybersecurity. Students will learn security concepts and then apply them to a given scenario. The goals of this course are to prepare students to study for one or more of the computer industry security certifications, take TestOut® Security Pro Certification as the Final Exam, and to take the Security+ certification exam on their own if they choose. Students should have a solid understanding of computer operating systems and networking prior to taking this course. Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 211.
  
  •  

    COMP 278 - Networking II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a continuation of Networking I (COMP 211) and will prepare students to become network administrators and other networking professionals.  Advanced networking concepts will be discussed and networking devices will be configured.  Students will take TestOut® Network Pro Certification as the Final Exam.  Fall semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): COMP 277 and COMP 246.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 211.
  
  •  

    COMP 279 - Cybersecurity II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will give students experience using various anti-hacking tools to make the network more secure. Students will explore and defend against network vulnerabilities and hacker exploits. The goal of this second cybersecurity course is to make students much more knowledgeable and well skilled in cybersecurity.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 277.
  
  •  

    COOP 101 - Cooperative Education I


    1 - 4 credits
    This course provides the first work experience with a college approved employer in the student’s field of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. One to four credits will be granted depending on the number of work hours and the job description.
    Prerequisite(s): GPA in major of 12 credits 3.0, overall GPA of 20 credits 2.75 and approval of faculty and coop coordinators.
  
  •  

    COOP 102 - Cooperative Education II


    1-4 credits
    This course provides the second work experience with a college approved employer in the student’s field of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. One to four credits will be granted depending on the number of work hours and the job description.
    Prerequisite(s): COOP 101.
  
  •  

    CRIM 100 - Crime and Justice Systems


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the field of criminology. Historical data; theories of causation; social control of behavior; development of laws; economic, political, social, and cultural changes will be examined. The student will study the Criminal Justice System as it evolved and exists in the United States including the police, courts and correctional facilities, and the administration of each. In addition to learning the terminology used in this particular field, the student will have an opportunity to examine methodology and personal values and attitudes.
  
  •  

    CRIM 125 - Juvenile Justice and Juvenile Delinquency


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the major professional, statutory and constitutional issues affecting the professional working within the juvenile justice system. A detailed examination of the way in which juveniles are processed through the court systems and the roles of the police, attorneys, child welfare, probation and the correctional officers are examined. The diagnostic assessment of delinquency, its implications for treatment, and treatment of delinquency are examined.
  
  •  

    CRIM 130 - Corrections


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the student to the field of corrections. Correctional history, theory, philosophy, and practice are discussed to give students a practical understanding of today’s corrections operations. An additional focus on what is done in corrections, why it is done, and future challenges facing correctional staff and administrators will be presented.
  
  •  

    CRIM 200 - Criminal Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course will introduce the student to the definitions of crimes as well as the Pennsylvania Crimes Code. Affirmative criminal defenses, mens rea, competency and inchoate crimes will be examined.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
  
  •  

    CRIM 210 - Criminal Procedure


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will introduce the student to the principles of criminal procedure with particular emphasis on federal and state constitutional limitations and rights.
    Prerequisite(s): CRIM 200.
  
  •  

    DRFT 108 - 3-D Geometric Modeling/SolidWorks®


    3 credits (2 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course implements the latest version of SolidWorks® parametric 3D software into the design process of mechanical components. Students will generate design tables from Excel spreadsheets to drive the design. Students will learn advanced functionality of the software while exploring alternative design solutions to local industry case studies. Select parts will be chosen to create a complete set of documentation and a physical model using advanced stereo-lithography and 3D printing technology.  Spring semester only.

     
    Prerequisite(s): DRFT 120 or permission of instructor.

  
  •  

    DRFT 109 - Digital Fabrication


    1 credits (1 lecture, 1 lab)
    This course is an introduction to personal digital fabrication, an essential skill for future STEM success. Students will learn how to be “makers” by using various types of open source 3D modeling software and fabrication equipment. In this project based learning environment, students will learn the basics of 3D printing, laser engraving/cutting, and other digital fabrication tools.
  
  •  

    DRFT 112 - Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD & T)


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a solid foundation in dimensioning and tolerancing terms, definitions, concepts, and applications.  Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing principles are built on these basics through print reading exercises, national and international standards and industrial applications.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): DRFT 114 or DRFT 120 or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    DRFT 114 - Blueprint Reading


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is structured to develop one’s ability to accurately interpret machine drawings and make simple shop sketches. The drawings and applications selected reflect the requirements and practices of industry. All drawings, sketches, and technical content conform to the latest ASME and ANSI Standards.  Fall semster only.
  
  •  

    DRFT 115 - Engineering Graphics


    3 credits (2 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course implements the engineering design process as an approach to problem solving.  The curriculum will emphasize skills such as technical sketching, orthographic projection, sectioning, dimensioning, applying tolerances, threads and fasteners, detail and assembly drawings. This course utilizes parametric modeling software.  Fall semester only.

     
    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 based on placement test scores; or a “C” or better in ENGL 029 or ENGL 030 and/or ENGL 034 or ENGL 035, as required; or transfer credits meeting or surpassing ENGL 101 prerequisites.

  
  •  

    DRFT 116 - Technology Applications with Excel


    1 credits (1 lecture, 1 lab)
    This course introduces the study of microcomputer programming in Microsoft Excel. Programming assignments emphasize technical applications. Industrial problems that require technical computer programming solutions are incorporated in the programming assignments whenever possible. This course meets the General Education competencies of Technological Competence (TC) and Critical Thinking (CT). Fall semester only.

     
    Corerequisite(s): MATH 101 or MATH 117 or permission of the instructor.

  
  •  

    DRFT 120 - Technical Graphics with AutoCAD®


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is an introduction to Computer Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) techniques.  Fundamental theories and principles include orthographic and axonometric projections.  Multi-disciplinary engineering drawings will be generated according to national and international standards.
  
  •  

    DRFT 290 - Practicum For Technologies


    3 credits (300 work hours per semester)
    A supervised work experience designed to allow the student to grow professionally, to identify strengths and weaknesses, to apply learned theory to practical situations, and to gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    ECON 101 - Principles of Economics - Macro Approach


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Principles of Economics - Macro Approach is a study of the nature and methodology of economics, national income, mixed capitalism and the market economy, money and banking, and economic growth.
  
  •  

    ECON 102 - Principles of Economics - Micro Approach


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Principles of Economics - Micro Approach is a basic study of market models: the price system, wage determination, labor sector, foreign economies and current economic problems.
  
  •  

    EDUC 101 - Creative Experiences


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course will identify basic elements, concepts, and vocabulary of the creative arts and explore the nature of creativity and its value in the growth of young children. Music, art, and creative movement will be examined. Students must conduct a minimum of five hours of observation in a PreK-4 setting and reflect upon their experiences.  
  
  •  

    EDUC 102 - Observation - Preschool - Grade 4


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    In observing the developmental patterns and behavior of childhood from preschool to grade four, observations will include recording information about the teacher, the classroom environment, materials and curriculum. Two letters of recommendation, a health assessment and the Mantoux T. B. test are required to do observations in daycare centers and in some preschools. Schools may require Act 34/114/151 clearances.
  
  •  

    EDUC 103 - Children’s Physical Growth, Health and Safety


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of the physical development of infants, toddlers, and young children with respect to health, safety, and nutritional needs. Emphasis will be placed on practices that guide daycare providers, child care group supervisors, and teachers in promoting a safe and healthy classroom setting.
  
  •  

    EDUC 104 - Children’s Environment


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The student will study the environmental influences on the Child including home/family, and multi-cultural society. Practices in parenting techniques and survey of community agencies serving children will be included.
  
  •  

    EDUC 111 - Academic Skills Prep for Educators


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course provides test preparation for the Pre-service Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) and the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators required for a state-approved Pennsylvania educator preparation certificate.  Instruction focuses on the required level of basic skills in reading, mathematics, and writing in order to qualify for admission to a state-approved Pennsylvania educator preparation program.

     

  
  •  

    EDUC 115 - Introduction to Education


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course investigates the professional demands and opportunities that characterize the contemporary teaching profession. Key historical, sociological, and philosophical aspects of American education are examined along with an overview of school governance, law, and finance. Effective models of instruction for diverse learners, including English Learners (EL), aligned with curriculum, lesson planning, and assessment are also reviewed. In addition, classroom management models and current trends in education are discussed. 
  
  •  

    EDUC 120 - Observations Experiences for Grades 5-12


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is a basic introductory course for students interested in exploring education in grades five through twelve as a career. The course involves lecture, seminar participation and observation of actual school situations. Schools may require Act 34/114/151 clearances.
  
  •  

    EDUC 131 - Introduction to American Sign Language


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This introductory course is designed to familiarize students with the dynamics of American Sign Language and expose them to culturally appropriate behavior with respect to deaf and hard of hearing people. The focus will be placed on expressive and receptive facial expression, natural body gestures, and manual communication. This course will provide the foundation needed to converse in American Sign Language.
  
  •  

    EDUC 204 - Curriculum and Advocacy for Early Childhood Education


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will explore central curricular approaches found and implemented in early childhood settings. Emphasis will be placed on constructing appropriate curriculum that creates a community of learners, advocates on behalf of young children, and establishes reciprocal relationships with families. Selection and development of materials and resources based on assessment data that meet the needs of diverse learners will also be included. Students must conduct a minimum of five hours of observation in a PreK-4 setting anf reflect upon their experiences.
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 101
  
  •  

    EDUC 205 - Children’s Language and Literature


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course will emphasize the linguistic development in children that is fostered through exposure to literature, while identifying specific developmental milestones in speech and language development. Students will learn techniques to create a print-rich environment in the early childhood setting while analyzing the cultural influences on language and literacy. Students must conduct a minimum of five hours of observation in a PreK-4 setting and reflect upon their experiences.
  
  •  

    EDUC 207 - Science for Young Children


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The Science for Young Children course is a survey of science materials and activities used in a preschool classroom. Development of teaching skills to maintain curiosity and experimentation and basic math skills are included.
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 101 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    EDUC 215 - Recognizing Diversity through Family, School, and Community Partnerships


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the relationship of cultural values and social contexts in the formation of a child’s self-concept and success in the educational environment. Students will be challenged to critique and utilize the principles of culturally responsive teaching, including establishing cultural connections, stressing collectivity as well as individuality, and examining the role of prejudice, stereotypes, racism, sexism, and learning exceptionalities in the early childhood setting. Strategies that bolster the partnerships between school, home, and the community for the purpose of student achievement will be discussed.
  
  •  

    EDUC 221 - Practicum in Early Childhood Education


    6 credits (2 lecture)
    Practicum is two lecture hours per week, plus 220 total hours of supervised work with young children. It includes involvement in the role of teaching and of assistant. Act 33 and 34 clearances, two letters of recommendation, a health assessment, the Mantoux T.B. test and student PSEA insurance are required.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of thirty credit hours in the program, fifteen of which must be in major with a C average and/or consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    EDUC 222 - Field Experience


    3 credits (1 lecture, 8 work hours per week)
    The Field Experience is one lecture hour per week, plus 120 total hours of supervised work with young children. It includes teaching and assisting in a classroom. Act 33/151 clearances, an F.B.I. Finger Print Check, two letters of recommendation, a health assessment, and the T.B. test are required. Student PSEA insurance is strongly recommended.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 credit hours in the program, 15 of which must be in major with a C average, and/or consent of the instructor.
  
  •  

    EDUC 232 - Introduction to Special Education


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a survey of current knowledge on individuals with exceptionalities across the lifespan. Content includes historical factors, legislation, etiology, characteristics, needs, educational strategies, including existing and emerging technologies, assessment, and support services of/for individuals with high and low incidence disabilities ranging from mild to severe levels of varying exceptionalities. Students must conduct a minimum of ten hours of observation in a PreK-12 setting and reflect upon their experiences.
  
  •  

    EDUC 233 - Education Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course analyzes state and federal statutes and regulations, and judicial questions that establish the legal framework within the educational institutions and school personnel function.
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 115.
  
  •  

    EDUC 235 - Education of Individuals with Exceptionalities


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The students will examine the curricular and instructional accommodations used in inclusive settings. The study of individuals with sensory, physical, cognitive, emotional, communication exceptionalities, and English Language Learners (ELL), will be included.
    Prerequisite(s): EDUC 232 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    EDUC 240 - Child Development


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course analyzes the development of individuals from conception to adolescence – physically, mentally, cognitively, emotionally, and socially. Course content is guided by current theory and research in the field of education through the topics of family, school, community, socioeconomic status, and political influences. Students must conduct a minimum of five hours of observation in a PreK-4 setting and reflect upon their experiences.
  
  •  

    EDUC 241 - Instructionial Strategies for English Language Development


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course addresses the general principles of how learners acquire a new language and establishes a framework for English Language Development (ELD). The adaptation of instructional and assessment strategies for teaching students whose first language is not English will be emphasized. Students must conduct a minimum of five hours of observation in a PreK-12 setting and reflect upon their experiences.
  
  •  

    ELEC 101 - DC Circuits


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course stresses the foundations of DC Circuit Analysis. Major topics included are: the structure of matter, units of measurement, engineering and scientific notation, Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems, superposition theorem, loop and nodal analysis, use of the VOM, DMM, and adjustable single polarity and bipolar power supplies. Circuit bread boarding techniques will be emphasized in the laboratory section of the course.  This course is primarily intended for students in the AAS Electronic Technology Program offered during the evening.)   Fall semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): High School Algebra or MATH 091.
  
  •  

    ELEC 102 - AC Circuits


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course covers the study of resistive and reactive components and circuits for time-varying signals. Major topics in AC Circuits include: Sinusoids, and transients, reactance, impedance, resonance, phasors, complex numbers, polar and rectangular notation and conversion, loop and nodal analysis using complex numbers. Use of the VOM, DMM, oscilloscope in the evaluation of time varying signals is stressed in the laboratory.  (This course is primarily intended for students in the AAS Electronic Technology Program offered in the evening.)  Spring semester only
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 101 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ELEC 110 - Electrical Fundamentals


    7 credits (5 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course covers the foundations of DC and AC electrical circuits. Major topics included are: atomic structure, units of measurement, engineering and scientific notation, Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems, superposition theorem, mesh and nodal analysis, reactance, impedance, resonance, and transformers.  Breadboarding techniques will be emphasized in the laboratory section of the course - along with the use of power supplies, DMMs, oscilloscopes, and function generators.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): C or better grade in high school Algebra or MATH 090 or MATH 091.
  
  •  

    ELEC 120 - Industrial Electricity and Maintenance


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    Industrial electricity deals mainly with control devices, power systems, and applications including the latest solid state controls and programmable controllers. The student first learns the basics of industrial electronics and machine control and then advances to more sophisticated systems.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 101 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ELEC 161 - Electronic Devices, Circuits, and Measurements


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    Intended as a bridge course to nanofabrication for non-electronics majors (physical science, biology, chemistry and pre-engineering majors), this course provides an introduction to passive and active circuit analysis and the use of basic electronic test equipment. Applications of microelectronics and nanofabrication technology in biomedical applications is emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 101, BIOL 120, CHEM 101, PHYS 101 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ELEC 221 - Electronics I


    5 credits (4 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is a semiconductor device course. The main topics covered are diode characteristics and applications, bipolar junction transistor characteristics, modeling, and operation in small-signal and large-signal amplifier circuits, field-effect transistor biasing and operation. There is also an emphasis on circuit simulation using PSpice.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 110, or ELEC 101 and ELEC 102.
  
  •  

    ELEC 222 - Electronics II


    5 credits (4 lecture, 3 lab)
    This is an applications and systems oriented course with emphasis placed on op amp and linear IC based circuit analysis and design.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 221 and ELEC 225.
  
  •  

    ELEC 225 - Digital Electronics


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is an introduction to digital logic and circuits. Characteristics of major families and their applications. Combinational logic synthesis, reduction and analysis techniques, as well as state machine design are covered.  This course meets the General Education Competency of Critical Thinking (CT).  Spring semester only.

     
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 110 or permission of instructor.

  
  •  

    ELEC 230 - Power Systems and Maintenance


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    Power Concepts covers the area of electricity concerned with the operation, applications, and control of rotating electrical machinery, polyphase power systems and transformers. Process control, motor control circuits and the maintenance of power equipment will also be presented.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): Either ELEC 110, or ELEC 101 and ELEC 102.
  
  •  

    ELEC 240 - Fundamentals of Microprocessors


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course introduces the student to the applications and operation of microprocessors and microprocessor-based systems. CPU architecture, assembly language programming and interfacing using common microprocessors and microcontrollers, and programmable logic devices are studied. Microprocessor applications in robotics, control systems, telecommunications and data acquisition are also covered.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 221 and ELEC 225.
  
  •  

    ELEC 245 - Robotics Enabling Technologies


    5 credits (4 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course covers the theory of operation of transducers, sensors, and data acquisition devices and techniques.  Microprocessor-based control of actuators such as stepper motors, dc motors, hydraulic actuators and “muscle wire” as applied to robotics applications is presented.  Physical operation of sensors, computer/transducer interfacing techniques, and processing of acquired data is analyzed, as well as the use of that data in the control of external actuators.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 221 and ELEC 225.
  
  •  

    ELEC 250 - Individual Research Project


    2 credits (2 lecture)
    This is a supervised work or research experience which allows the student to grow professionally, to apply learned theory to practical situations, and to gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career. This is a required course for all Electronics majors. The assembling of kits such as those available from Heathkit, Graymark, Radio Shack, etc., are not acceptable research projects.  Project topic must be approved by the professor assigned to the course.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 110, ELEC 221, ELEC 222, ELEC 225, ELEC 240, and 2.0 or higher QPA overall in electronics.
  
  •  

    ELEC 255 - Integration of Robotics Systems


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    Building on the basic principles covered in ELEC 245, the course includes the topics of cooperative/swarming robotic behavior, robot vision concepts, inertial measurement techniques, global positioning systems (GPS), and telemetry techniques. Emphasis will be placed on more complex robotic applications including unmanned ground, sea and aerial vehicles and other contemporary topics.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 245.
  
  •  

    ELEC 272 - Material, Safety, and Equipment Overview for Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides an overview of the materials, safety and equipment issues encountered in the practice of “top down” and “bottom up” nanofabrication. It focuses on safety, environmental and health issues in equipment operation and materials handling as well as on cleanroom protocol. Topics to be covered include: cleanroom operation, OSHA lab standard safety training, health issues, Biosafety Levels (BSL) guidelines, and environmental concerns. Safety issues dealing with nanofabrication equipment, materials, and processing will also be discussed including those pertinent to biological materials, wet benches, thermal processing tools, plasma based equipment, stamping and embossing lithography tools, vacuum systems and pumps, gas delivery systems and toxic substance handling and detection. Specific material handling procedures to be discussed will include corrosive, flammable, and toxic materials, biological materials, carcinogenic materials, DI water, solvents, cleaners, photo resists, developers, metals, acids, and bases.

    The course will also concentrate on safe equipment maintenance and operation. Students will be given an overview of basic nanofabrication materials, equipment and equipment operation. This technical overview and operational introduction to processing equipment and characterization tools will include: chemical processing, furnaces, vacuum based processing (physical vapor deposition equipment, chemical vapor deposition equipment, and dry etching equipment), and lithography as well as scanning probe microscopy (e.g., atomic force microscopy), optical microscope, electron microscopy (e.g., scanning electron microscopy) ellipsometer, nanospec, and profilometer equipment.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 273.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222, ELEC 240, METR 115, CHEM 101.

  
  •  

    ELEC 273 - Basic Nanotechnology Processes


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is the hands-on introduction to the processing involved in “top down”, “bottom up”, and hybrid nanofabrication. The majority of the course details a step-by-step description of the equipment, facilities processes and process flow needed to fabricate devices and structures. Students learn to appreciate processing and manufacturing concerns including process control, contamination, yield, and processing interaction. The students design process flows for micro- and nano-scale systems. Students learn the similarities and differences in “top down” and “bottom up” equipment and process flows by undertaking hands-on processing. This hands-on exposure covers basic nanofabrication processes including colloidal chemistry, self assembly, catalyzed nanoparticle growth, lithography, wet and dry etching, physical vapor deposition, and chemical vapor deposition.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 272.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222, ELEC 240, METR 115, CHEM 101.
  
  •  

    ELEC 274 - Materials in Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is an in-depth, hands-on exposure to materials fabrication approaches used in nanofabrication. Students learn that these processes can be guided by chemical or physical means or by some combination of these. Hands-on exposure will include self-assembly; colloidal chemistry; atmosphere, low-pressure and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition; sputtering; thermal and electron beam evaporation; nebulization and spin-on techniques. This course is designed to give students hands-on experience in depositing, fabricating and self-assembling a wide variety of materials tailored for their mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, and biological properties.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 282.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 272, ELEC 273.
  
  •  

    ELEC 282 - Patterning for Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is a hands-on treatment of all aspects of advanced pattern transfer and pattern transfer equipment including probe techniques; stamping and embossing; e-beam; and optical contact and stepper systems. The course is divided into five major sections. The first section is an overview of all pattern generation processes covering aspects from substrate preparation to tool operation. The second section concentrates on photolithography and examines such topics as mask template, and mold generation. Chemical makeup of resists will be discussed including polymers, solvents, sensitizers, and additives. The role or dyes and antireflective coatings will be discussed. In addition, critical dimension (CD) control and profile control of resists will be investigated. The third section will discuss the particle beam lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography. The fourth section covers probe pattern generation and the fifth section explores embossing lithography, step-and-flash, stamp lithography, and self assembled lithography.  Summer semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 274.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 272, ELEC 273.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5