Oct 06, 2022  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2014-2015 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    MATH 118 - Technical Mathematics II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a continuation of Technical Mathematics I beginning with the study of factors, exponents, and factoring. Other topics include quadratic equations, advanced trigonometric topics, exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, and an introduction to statistics.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 117 or equivalent.
  
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    MATH 125 - Business Calculus


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for Business Administration majors with an emphasis on business and economics applications of calculus. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, derivatives and integration of those functions and applications of the calculus processes. The topics will be presented graphically, analytically, and numerically.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 101.
  
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    MATH 182 - Mathematics for Elementary Education


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for students in elementary education and early childhood education majors only. It is intended to provide a thorough knowledge of the concepts of problem solving, set theory, number theory, and the theory of arithmetic.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or equivalent.
  
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    MATH 183 - Mathematics for Elementary Education II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for students in elementary education as a continuation of MATH 182. It provides students with conceptual knowledge of statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 182
  
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    MATH 221 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is basic to the further study of mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences. It includes the study of coordinates and related variables, polynomials, and their graphs, differentiation of functions with applications, and integration of functions with applications.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or MATH 118.
  
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    MATH 222 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry II


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is a continuation of Calculus and Analytic Geometry I. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of integration, sequence and series, polar and parametric equations, and analytical geometry. Applications of the derivative and definite integral to the physical sciences, social sciences, and engineering are also studied.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 221.
  
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    MATH 223 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry III


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is a continuation of Calculus and Analytic Geometry II. It includes a study of plane and solid analytical geometry and vectors, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and vector analysis.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 222.
  
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    MATH 224 - Differential Equations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introductory study of the methods of solution of ordinary differential equations including applications. Included are first order solutions using exact, separable, homogeneous, and linear types. Second order solutions, series solutions, numerical solutions, and Laplace transforms are included.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 222.
  
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    MATH 230 - Linear Algebra


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This is a course which provides the basic fundamentals of Linear Algebra. Included are the systems of linear equations, and matrices. Vectors in 2-space and 3-space lead to a study of vector spaces, linear transformation, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 221.
  
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    MECH 103 - Manufacturing Processes and Materials


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides a basic understanding and application of materials, machines, and processes by which materials are formed into useful products. Manufacturing processes, fundamentals of industrial metallurgy, principles of quality assurance, and workplace safety will be covered.
  
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    MECH 114 - Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Machining


    3 credits (3 lecture, 1 lab)
    This course will develop the basic terminology and skills to enable the student’s performance and increase efficiency in Computer Numerical Control programming and machining. Basic programming procedures and machining operations will be developed in accordance with industrial standards.

    Corequisite:  MATH 117 or MACH 117 or permission of instructor.

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills: job planning, benchwork and layout, drill press skills, measurement, materials and safety, and CNC milling and turning—program setup and operations (Machining Level I Standard).

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MECH 120 - Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Programming I (Mill I)


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course will provide the basic knowledge and skills for developing Computer Numerical Control (CNC) programs. Emphasis will be on the understanding of CNC Code as well as the mathematics and computer skills necessary for developing well organized and effective CNC milling operations. This course will benefit the working machinist, tool and die maker, students entering the manufacturing field, and entry-level CNC programmers.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MECH 114 or permission of instructor
  
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    MECH 121 - Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Programming II (Lathe I)


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course emphasizes Computer Automated Manufacturing (CAM) work flow. The practice and theory of straight, taper and radius turning, boring, grooving, threading, tapping, and contouring from geometry creation through generated NC code will be covered.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MECH 114 or permission of instructor.
  
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    MECH 202 - Mechanics I (Technical Statics)


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the process of engineering analysis. Static applications of Newton’s first law of motion are studied. The concept of the free body diagram and its use in engineering analysis is introduced and emphasized. Topics of discussion include force analysis, resultants and equilibrium of coplanar force systems, analysis of trusses and frames, friction, centroids and centers of gravity, and area moments of inertia. These subjects enable the student to predict the external forces and reactions on an object. Problem solving is emphasized. This course is taught using algebraic and trigonometric methods of analysis.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101.
  
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    MECH 208 - Strength of Materials


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course continues the process of engineering analysis as developed in Mechanics 1, shifting from the external reactions to the resulting internal stresses and strains in an object. Topics include straight line tension and compression stress, shear stress and strain, properties of materials, torsional stress in circular sections, shear and moment diagrams, stresses in beams, design of beams, and deflection of beams. These subjects enable the student to design simple force carrying members. Problem solving is emphasized. Computer applications with beam analysis programs used in industry are taught and integrated into this course.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MECH 202.
  
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    MECH 210 - Fluids


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to fluid mechanics; the study of fluids, how forces act on fluids and their resulting reactions. Topics include the properties of fluids, fluid flow, the Bernoulli equation, the energy equation, the concept of viscosity, flow friction, and the design of pipe systems. Problem solving in fluid systems is emphasized. Computer applications with a pump selection program used in industry is taught and integrated into the course.  Fall semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): MATH 118 or MATH 102.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101.
  
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    MECH 211 - Tool & Die Design


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is being offered to provide technology students and people in manufacturing environments with the basic skills needed to design jigs and fixtures, plastics injection molds, and progressive and stamping dies. Design, function, and construction principles will be covered.   Fall semester only.

     
    Prerequisite(s): DRFT 120 and MATH 117 or permission of instructor

  
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    MECH 215 - Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Programming III


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course uses CAM to it’s designed limits by including 3D tool paths. CAD and CAM applications will be used for part manufacturing. Part presentation will be enhanced by solid modeling.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MECH 121.
  
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    MECH 220 - Automation and Robotics


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides the basic principles of robotic technology through the fields of control theory, computer programming, artificial intelligence, human factors, and production theory. Movement systems, electrical and hydraulic power systems, and sensing systems are introduced.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 117 or MATH 101 and PHYS 101
  
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    MECH 281 - Product Realization Capstone Project


    4 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This project-based course integrates the many activities associated with the product realization process. Students will apply the coursework, knowledge, skills, and experiential learning from previous courses as members of a multidisciplinary design development team. Teams will use technical communication to plan, execute, document, and present a comprehensive design project.  Spring semester only.
     
    Prerequisite(s): The student must have completed the courses in the first three semesters of the Manufacturing w/Advanced Technology, the Machine Drafting and Design with CADD, or the Computer Aided Machining Technology A.A.S. Degree program or permission of instructor.
  
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    METR 106 - Metrology Practicum


    1 credits Work-Research Experience (minimum of 64 work hours per semester)
    This work experience is designed to allow the student to grow professionally, to identify strengths and weaknesses, to apply learned theory to practical situations, and to gain an appreciation of the role, duties, responsibilities and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career.
    Prerequisite(s): 2.0 GPA and 24 credits completed in the Metrology Program
  
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    METR 110 - Dimensional Metrology


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is an introduction to metrology emphasizing the theory and proper use of dimensional equipment, collection and statistical treatment of data, and blueprint reading. The intent is to develop the student’s interest and understanding of metrology along with a thorough knowledge of laboratory technique.  Field trips may be required. Fall semester only.
  
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    METR 111 - Physical Metrology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is a study of physical metrology emphasizing the theory and proper use of applied mechanical measurement equipment. The intent is to develop the student’s interest and understanding of physical metrology along with a thorough knowledge of laboratory technique.  Field trips may be required.  Spring semester only.
    Corerequisite(s): PHYS 102
    Prerequisite(s): METR 110
  
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    METR 125 - Optical Metrology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    The course presents physical and geometrical optics with applications to a variety of areas of measurement. Measurement techniques include mirrors, lenses, diffraction gratings, and interferometry.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101 or equivalent
  
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    METR 217 - Electrical Metrology


    5 credits (4 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course introduces the student to the analog semiconductor devices and circuits commonly used in electrical instrumentation. The course then brings together various digital and analog circuits as they are applied in electric meters. This leads into actual electrical calibration and calibration laboratory practices and procedures. Construction and troubleshooting of circuits, documentation and control procedures, instrument calibration, and measurement uncertainty will be emphasized.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 110 and ELEC 225
  
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    METR 275 - Project Seminar


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course allows the student to select, design, construct, and perform a measurement experiment. The project must demonstrate precision measurement techniques.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing in Metrology Program and permission of instructor.
  
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    MTPY 101 - Introduction to Massage Therapy, Theory, Techniques and Practice


    4 credits (2 lecture, 4 lab)
    An overview of the field of massage therapy including a history of Swedish massage from ancient to modern times. It includes an introduction to the different types of massage strokes such as superficial stroking, deep touch and kneading. Discussions will also include the indications (benefits), contraindications, and precautions of massage. The course will cover the role of disease in massage therapy. The study of body mechanics, positioning, draping, proper sanitation, hygiene, and safety will be covered. The course objectives are enhanced through varied learning experiences including lecture, laboratory, and readings.
    Corerequisite(s): BIOL 131.
    Prerequisite(s): High School Biology or BIOL 115 or BIOL 101.
    BIOL 131
  
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    MTPY 102 - Intermediate Massage Therapy, Theory, Techniques and Practice


    5 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab)
    An overview of anatomy, palpation, and kinesiology. Discussions will continue covering the five basic Swedish massage strokes and their application to the entire body. This course will provide the student with an introduction of massage techniques for table and chair massages. Topics will include screening and interviewing clients, observation and consultation techniques. Students will be responsible for the set up and proper infection control and clean-up. An introductory discussion of the various massage associations will be covered. The course objectives are enhanced through varied learning experiences including lecture, laboratory, readings, and portfolio.
    Corerequisite(s): BIOL 132.
    Prerequisite(s): MTPY 101.
  
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    MTPY 103 - Advanced Massage Therapy, Theory, Techniques and Practice


    5 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab)
    The study of advanced massage techniques utilizing chair, table, alternate positions, and procedures preparing the student for entry level practice as a massage therapist. Information concerning professional issues and contemporary practice techniques of massage therapy will be discussed with emphasis on various practice settings for massage therapy in the community. Major concerns and trends of the profession will be presented and include ethics, licensure, personal safety, client safety, and continuing education. Knowledge and skills essential in developing and marketing a massage practice, preparing a budget, a business plan, reimbursement, quality assurance, and job readiness topics will be covered.
    Prerequisite(s): MTPY 102.
  
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    MUSC 101 - Introduction to Music


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of the elements of music; the history and development of music and musical instruments; the international character of music and the contributions of nations and ethnic groups to the literature of music; and selections from the vast literature of musical compositions for soloists, choruses, and small and large instrumental ensembles.
  
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    MUSC 110 - Music Theory


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Music Theory is an elementary music theory course which addresses its basic elements. It prepares the beginner for more advanced work and enables the student with some experience to review the fundamentals of music theory. An ability to read notation is recommended.
  
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    MUSC 114 - Choral Ensemble


    1 credits (2 lab, and as needed before performances)
    Choral Ensemble affords students the opportunity to sing major and minor choral works of high quality with a community choral ensemble. Music may include works from various time periods as well as works in foreign languages, and will afford opportunity to read music. Choral ensemble performances will expose students to a variety of concert styles and interaction with community members. Rehearsals and performances are usually held off campus.
  
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    NPHS 101 - Orientation to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a broad overview of homeland security and homeland defense undertaken in the United States since 9/11. An accepted body of knowledge required of the homeland security professional is outlined. Key topics include: the enemy mindset, the key players at the federal, state, and local level, and the homeland security policies and procedures enacted since 9/11.
  
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    NPHS 102 - Perspectives on Terrorism


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an in-depth examination behind the criminology of terrorism. The typologies of terrorism, tactics of terrorism, terroristic profiles, and basic organizational structures of terrorist groups will be explored. Historical and modern day terrorism throughout the world will also be investigated along with the study of religion and cultural conflict as it relates to terrorism.
  
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    NPHS 103 - Introduction to Physical Security and Deterrents to Terrorism


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses on the development and implementation of a Vulnerability Assessment (VA) program. Students will investigate the role of (VA) in the Risk Assessment Process (RAP), and learn how it supports the development of the Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) and the Site Physical Security Program (SPSP). The Criticality, Accessibility, Recuperability, Vulnerability, Effect, and Recognizability (CARVER) System, a step-by-step VA approach will also be evaluated. In addition, the student will apply research methodology for gathering information, conducting investigations, conducting interviews and briefings with the clients. Other course topics include: facility idiosyncrasies, physical and cyber security, credibility and nuisance tests, personnel access, traffic control and other mitigation measures.
  
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    NPHS 104 - Federal Homeland Security Grant Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides the skills necessary for writing winning grant proposals for federal homeland security grants. Complex grant writing issues, specifically to garner federal and state emergency and homeland security monies, will be addressed by offering participants practical, real-world solutions to their grant writing challenges.
  
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    NPHS 105 - Introduction to Cyber Security


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the dynamic information of security covering a broad range of areas including hacker and personal information protection along with up-to-the-minute developments in information security networks. Other areas of study include ethical, legal, and moral issues; industry and vendor-specific certifications; encryption and decryption, methods and protocols; and the security system design life cycle.
  
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    NPHS 201 - Continuity of Operation Planning with COOP Exercise


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course integrates the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) Online Class - IS 547 Introduction to Continuity of Operations (COOP) providing a working knowledge of COOP. Topics include an overview of the following areas: essential functions, delegation of authority, succession planning, alternate facilities, interoperable communications, vital records, tools, directives and databases, and human capital. Training in existing templates and models that may be used in developing and maintaining a COOP will also be explored, culminating in a COOP plan for a local business or government entity. Certification is available through FEMA.
  
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    NPHS 202 - Emergency Medical Services and Health Services Orientation


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive knowledge of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems, hospital disaster response and supplemental resources including the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) and Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMAT). This program includes EMS development, training and educational requirements, medical care advances, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), medical response priorities, and an introduction to disaster medical operations. Appropriate clearances may be required.
  
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    NPHS 203 - Homeland Security and Emergency Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the management perspective of organizations linked to: mitigation, prevention, planning, preparedness, readiness, response and recovery, as they relate to homeland security events. U.S. policies and programs are assessed in terms of the hazards posed by international and domestic terrorism, particularly the risks posed by weapons of mass destruction. The unpredictable nature of terroristic attacks is also explored.
  
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    NURS 101 - Nursing I: Introduction to Nursing Care


    8 credits (4 lecture, 12 lab)
    This course introduces students to fundamental principles of nursing practice. The focus is on providing basic nursing care to individuals in a variety of health care settings. The student will learn basic skills and begin to practice nursing in a safe manner. Clinical experiences will be obtained in a simulated lab environment as well as in a variety of health care settings.
    Corequisite: NURS 141, BIOL 131, PHED 125, and PSYC 201.
  
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    NURS 102 - Nursing II: Nursing Care of Patients Throughout the Lifespan


    9 credits (5 lecture, 12 lab)
    This course prepares the student to provide evidence-based nursing care to individuals of varied age groups. Students will use the best evidence in providing and managing safe nursing care for: maternity patients and their newborns, pediatric patients, and adult patients with common chronic disorders in a variety of settings.
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 142, BIOL 132 and PSYC 203.
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 101, NURS 141, BIOL 131, PHED 125, and PSYC 201.
  
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    NURS 103 - Nursing III: Nursing Care of Patients with Acute Health Problems


    9 credits (5 lecture, 12 lab)
    This course provides the necessary knowledge and skill acquisition for the student to effectively manage the nursing care of individuals with common acute medical-surgical disorders and mental health disorders. The focus is on understanding and applying concepts of pathophysiology and evidence-based nursing care. Clinical experiences occur in a variety of settings.
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 143, ENGL 101, and BIOL 201.
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 102, NURS 142, BIOL 132, and PSYC 203.
  
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    NURS 104 - Nursing IV: Nursing Care of Patients with Complex Health Problems


    8 credits (5 lecture, 9 lab)
    This course prepares the student to provide competent, holistic, and evidence-based nursing care for individuals with multiple and/or complicated medical-surgical disorders. Nursing management and interdisciplinary collaboration skills are stressed. Clinical experiences are in the medical-surgical and critical care hospital settings.
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 144, NURS 105, ENGL 102, and MATH 100.
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 103, NURS 143, and BIOL 201.
  
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    NURS 105 - Nursing V: Transition to Practice


    3 credits (1 lecture, 24 lab)
    This clinical course assists the student with the transition from the role of student nurse to the role of graduate professional nurse. Leadership and management skills are emphasized. Preceptored by a registered professional nurse, who serves as a mentor in a concentrated clinical practice experience, the student has the opportunity to integrate the knowledge, clinical skills, and standards of professional nursing practice necessary to fulfill the professional nurse role.
    Corerequisite(s): ENGL 102, and MATH 100.
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 104, NURS 144, BIOL 201, and PSYC 203.
  
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    NURS 120 - Critical Thinking for Nurses


    2 credits (2 lecture hours)
    This course is designed to foster the development of clinical judgment skills of those preparing for professional nursing. Participants will explore critical thinking and utilize basic analytical techniques in the completion of multiple choice and innovation test items such as those on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 102
  
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    NURS 135 - Role Transition to Nursing Process


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will assist licensed practical nurses (LPN’s), and other advanced standing students with the transition into the nursing program at Butler County Community College. Fundamentals of safe, ethical, and legal nursing will be reviewed.  Opportunities to review nursing skills and practice documentation of nursing care are provided using electronic resources. 
    Corerequisite(s): BIOL 131, PSYC 201, PSYC 201, PHED 125, and NURS 141
    Prerequisite(s): Current, valid PA LPN licensure, or prior coursework equivalent to NURS 101.
  
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    NURS 136 - Health Information Literacy for Evidence Based Practice


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course introduces students to the process of evidence-based practice in nursing. The emphasis will be on the first two steps of the process: formulating clinical questions and finding the evidence. Participants will use information retrieval techniques to locate evidence in the medical literature. Using online medical databases and Internet resources, they will learn how to access, appraise and integrate information into the practice of health care.
  
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    NURS 141 - Pharmacology for Nurses I


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course introduces students to basic concepts of pharmacology and safe nursing practice in medication administration. Concepts include: accurate dose calculation, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, cultural and ethical considerations related to pharmacology, and legal implications of medicine administration. The techniques used to maximize safety in the administration of medications are emphasized. 
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 101, BIOL 131, PHED 125, and PSYC 201.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Nursing Program.
  
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    NURS 142 - Pharmacology for Nurses II


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course emphasizes the nursing role in pharmacological treatment for maternal-child, pediatric, and common chronic disorders. It is designed to assist the student to apply critical thinking skills in the administration of medications for individuals in the clinical setting. 
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 102, BIOL 132, PSYC 203.
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 101, NURS 141, BIOL 131, PHED 125, and PSYC 201.
  
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    NURS 143 - Pharmacology for Nurses III


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course emphasizes the nursing role in the pharmacological treatment of acute medical-surgical and mental health disorders. It is designed to further develop the student’s ability to safely administer and monitor the effects of medications.
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 103, ENGL 101, and BIOL 201.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 132, PSYC 203, NURS 102, and NURS 142.
  
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    NURS 144 - Pharmacology for Nurses IV


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course teaches the nursing role in pharmacological treatment of advanced medical-surgical and life-threatening disorders. Emphasis is on applying critical thinking skills to the safe administration and monitoring of multiple medications and medications that require additional precautions and titration.
    Corerequisite(s): NURS 104, NURS 105, MATH 100, and ENGL 102.
    Prerequisite(s): NURS 103, NURS 143, ENGL 101, and BIOL 201.
  
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    OADM 107 - Document Formatting


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course develops keyboarding speed and accuracy based on proper techniques. Students create and format business documents in a Windows environment where emphasis is placed on proofreading skills.
  
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    OADM 110 - Microsoft® Word


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive knowledge of Microsoft® Word and its capabilities to create professional documents. Students will learn the proper procedures for utilizing the commands in the software to enable them to be more productive in document creation.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in OADM 107 or COMP 210.
  
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    OADM 115 - Microsoft® Publisher


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive knowledge of Microsoft® Publisher and its capabilities to efficiently create letterheads, business cards, envelopes, flyers, newsletters, brochures, and other specialty documents. Emphasis will be placed on desktop design principles and identification of audience, purpose, content, and publication of documents.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in OADM 107 or COMP 210.
  
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    OADM 132 - Microsoft® Excel


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive knowledge of Microsoft® Excel and its capabilities to create and manage spreadsheets.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in OADM 107 or COMP 210.
  
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    OADM 135 - Microsoft® Access


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive knowledge of Microsoft® Access and its capabilities to create and utilize databases for professional purposes. Students will learn the proper procedures for database creation and management.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in OADM 107 or COMP 210.
  
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    OADM 141 - Legal Terminology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to introduce students to legal terms and their definitions, synonyms, pronunciations, and usage. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of legal terminology through the study of law itself.
  
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    OADM 204 - Administrative Office Procedures


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to assess the student’s application of office administration functions and procedures. Emphasis will be placed on communication and organizational skills, use of Microsoft® Office applications, and business etiquette.
    Corequisite or Prerequisite: OADM 110, OADM 132, and OADM 228.
  
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    OADM 205 - Legal Office Administration Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    This supervised practice will provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in a legal office setting.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 hours in the program and 18 hours in the major with a “C” average and/or permission of the instructor.
  
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    OADM 206 - Executive Office Administration Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    This supervised practice will provide students with the opportunity to acquire experience in an office setting.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 hours in the program and 18 hours in the major with a “C” average and/or permission of the instructor.
  
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    OADM 228 - Microsoft® PowerPoint


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive coverage of the use of Microsoft® PowerPoint software and its application in today’s business office environment. Numerous project-based activities will provide students with opportunities for extensive hands-on practice with creating and delivering presentations.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in OADM 107 or COMP 210.
  
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    OADM 281 - Medical Office Administration Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    This supervised practice will provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in a medical office setting.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 hours in the program and 18 hours in the major with a “C” average and/or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PHED 102 - Physical Fitness


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is designed to improve the overall physical well-being on an individual basis. The course utilizes the Aerobic concepts and principles emphasizing running, walking, and cycling. The objective is to stress the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and monitor that stress toward an improved level of fitness. Students beyond the age of 35 may want to obtain a physical exam before enrolling in this class. These classes may be used as a partial fulfillment of the core requirement for Physical Education or may be used as electives.
  
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    PHED 105 - Outdoor Adventure


    1 credits (3 lab)
    Outdoor Adventure is a course designed to provide the student with the introduction to a series of lifetime outdoor adventure activities. The student will experience such activities as canoeing, backpacking and orienteering. Additional class time required for field and overnight trips. Student must be a competent swimmer and in good physical condition. These classes may be used as a partial fulfillment of the core requirement for Physical Education or may be used as electives.
  
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    PHED 125 - Physical Wellness


    2 credits (1 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed for the student who wants not only to improve his/her physical well-being, but also to develop academic concepts and principles of physical exercise. Emphasis will involve a balanced integration of the wellness components, including the physical, mental, social and emotional. Emphasis also will be placed on structured weekly workouts and on developing individualized exercise prescription, including emotional support systems necessary for adhering to a long-term lifestyle of exercise. These classes may be used as a partial fulfillment of the core requirement for Physical Education or may be used as electives.
  
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    PHED 127 - Dance Fundamentals


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop a basic skill level in fundamental dance movements. Students will explore the elements of dance through creative activities and have movement experiences in folk, square and social dance. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of dance as an academic discipline in addition to its importance as an art form, entertainment and life-long social activity.
  
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    PHED 128 - Introduction to Yoga


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is designed to learn the fundamentals of yoga, and to improve the physical and mental well-being through mastery of the body. This will be achieved through Hatha yoga exercises such as holding postures, proper breathing, and meditation. The course puts special emphasis on individual differences, and illustrates basic routines to enhance every aspect of life.
  
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    PHED 129 - Introduction to Pilates


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is an introduction to Pilates exercises. Students will be introduced to the importance of maintaining an exercise program that limits stress on joints. The focus and development of this course is on the core center, correct breathing, as well as correct alignment of the body.
  
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    PHED 130 - Canoeing and Water Safety


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is designed to enhance the student’s knowledge of canoeing and water safety. The student will learn about the hazards associated with water, learn how to prepare for a canoeing trip, and develop basic water safety and canoeing skills. Student must be a competent swimmer and in good physical condition. Classroom, pool session and river trips (which may last longer than the scheduled class) are required. Additional lab fees (use of indoor pool) may be required.
  
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    PHED 131 - Step Aerobics


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is designed not only for the student who wants to learn bench step aerobics but who also wants to improve cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength and endurance. Emphasis will be on correct body form and alignment while performing a total body workout that includes warm up, a step bench workout, a muscular, toning and strengthening segment and a cool down/stretching/flexibility segment. Emphasis will also be placed on the ability to performing consistent class workouts in order to improve cardiovascular fitness as demonstrated by student attendance and participation. Class workouts are choreographed to music.
  
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    PHED 132 - Basketball/Weight Training


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is a one semester course concentrating on two separate activities, each receiving seven and one-half weeks of instruction. Basketball will emphasize individual skill development, team concepts and an understanding of offensive and defensive schemes. Weight Training will concentrate on individual development, strength assessment and an individualized program that will enhance the development of muscle strength and endurance.
  
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    PHED 134 - Volleyball/Softball


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is a one semester course with each activity receiving seven and one-half weeks of separate instruction. Volleyball will emphasize individual skill development, team concepts and patterns of play, and the recreational value throughout life. Softball is designed to improve individual skills and develop an understanding of strategies associated with both offense and defense. Students will receive the opportunity to implement improved skills at all playing positions.
  
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    PHED 136 - Racquetball/Tennis


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course concentrates on two separate activities, each receiving seven and one-half weeks of separate instruction. Both activities are designed for the beginning and intermediate player. Emphasis is placed on fundamental skills, offensive and defensive strategies, the importance of court position and knowledge of game rules and etiquette. This class may be used as partial fulfillment of the core requirement for physical education or may be used as a general elective.
  
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    PHED 138 - Badminton/Golf


    1 credits (3 lab)
    This course is designed to offer two separate activities, each receiving seven and one-half weeks of separate instruction. Emphasis is placed on fundamental skills, knowledge of game rules and recreational values throughout life associated with each sport.
  
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    PHED 140 - River Kayaking


    1 credits (.33 lecture, 1.33 laboratory hours)
    This course develops river kayaking and safety skills utilizing whitewater kayaks. Course components include how to prepare for the paddling environment, identifying water features and hazards, paddling techniques, and water safety skills in Class I and II. Student must be a competent swimmer and in good physical condition.
  
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    PHED 144 - Table Tennis/Archery


    1 credits (3 lab)
    Table Tennis/Archery is a course designed to offer two separate activities, each receiving 7-1/2 weeks of separate instruction. Emphasis is placed on fundamental skills, knowledge of game rules, and recreational values throughout life associated with each sport.
  
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    PHED 171 - Backpacking and Rock Climbing


    1 credits (3 lab)
    Backpacking and Rock Climbing is a course designed to provide the student with an introduction to a series of lifetime outdoor adventure activities. The student will experience such activities as backpacking, rock climbing, and rappelling. Additional class time will be required for field and overnight trips. students must be in good physical condition.
  
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    PHIL 201 - Introduction to Philosophy


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course involves a presentation of major terms in philosophy; a history of man’s thought from ancient times to the present; the contributions of past and modern philosophers; and an examination of pressing social problems of modern man.
  
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    PHIL 208 - Ethics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses upon various criteria for determining ethical practices. Although philosophical in nature, the course draws upon literature and film, history, religion, psychology, and sociology in seeking personal, social and professional ethics to find order. The terms good and right are discussed in the decision-making process.
  
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    PHIL 215 - Introduction to Religions of the World


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will introduce students to the major historical religions of the world. Students will study the historical origins of these religions as well as the development of their doctrines and practices and thus gain an informed perspective on how religion shapes the world today.
    Prerequisite(s): English I.
  
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    PHSC 110 - Environmental Science


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This non-majors course provides the student with an introduction to air, water, and soil phenomena. Such topics as ozone depletion, acid rain, and the global warming are studied. National and global environmental impacts are debated using current events as examples. Laboratory experiments plus fieldwork will reinforce concepts discussed in lecture.
  
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    PHSC 114 - Weather Phenomena


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is an introduction to meteorology for non-science students. Topics included are atmosphere composition, processes causing weather phenomena, elements of weather forecasting, short and long term conditions causing weather/climate change, optical phenomena of the atmosphere and interpretation of weather maps. Conditions permitting, a field trip is included showing the methods used to collect weather data.
  
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    PHSC 120 - Principles of Geology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is an introduction to the various branches of geology for Liberal Arts students. Topics include rock formation, geologic time, weathering, erosion, river systems, ground water, glaciation, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanism. Laboratory exercises include the study of minerals, rocks, topographic maps, and geologic maps. Emphasis is on rock types, features of the landscape, and the processes which have shaped Western Pennsylvania.
  
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    PHSC 123 - Astronomy


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This is a descriptive, introductory course in astronomy for Liberal Arts students. An overview of the history of astronomy and descriptions of the sky, our moon, the planets of our solar system, the sun, other stars, stellar evolution, and the Milky Way, are included. The College’s 14-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope is used for solar and night-time observations.
  
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    PHYS 101 - Physics I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed as an introduction to Physics for students in technology and Liberal Arts programs. Topics include vectors, kinematics, dynamics (translational and rotational), energy and power, momentum properties of materials, and the gas laws and temperature. Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) activities are exclusively utilized.
    Corerequisite(s): MATH 101 or MATH 117
  
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    PHYS 102 - Physics II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is a continuation of Physics I. Topics include heat transfer, thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves, sound, electrostatics, DC circuits, magnetism, alternating current, and optics. Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) activities are utilized in 70% of the lab exercises.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHYS 112 - Descriptive Physics


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course prepares students who have had no experience with physics for entry into college physics and technology courses. This course will teach a number of fundamental physical principles and their applications. Definitions of basic terms, units of measurement, use of formulas, and computation will be emphasized. May not be taken by students who have successfully completed Physics I.
    Corerequisite(s): MATH 091 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHYS 221 - Engineering Physics I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This calculus oriented physics course is designed for students in Physics, Engineering, Chemistry, or Mathematics. Topics include static and motional mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) activities are utilized.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 221 or concurrent registration and high school Physics or equivalent.
  
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    PHYS 222 - Engineering Physics II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    Physics 222 is a continuation of Physics 221. Topics include thermodynamics, electric field, electric potential, capacitance, DC current and circuitry, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, inductance, and alternating current. Problem solving is very strongly emphasized. Microcomputer Based Laboratory (MBL) activities are utilized.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 221 and MATH 222 or concurrent registration.
  
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    PHYS 241 - Statics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This engineering course uses vector and scalar analysis to study the properties of forces and movement. Free-body diagrams and Newton’s 1st and 3rd Laws will be used to solve various engineering problems. Problem types will include force reactions on rigid bodies, structural analysis, and friction. Centroid concepts and moments of inertia will be emphasized.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 221 and MATH 222 or concurrent registration.
  
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    PHYS 242 - Dynamics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a detailed review of the concepts of force, mass, and acceleration via Newton’s Laws of Motion. Vector algebra and scalar techniques will be used to analyze the relationships between forces and their resultant motions. Free-body diagrams will be used to solve various engineering problems. Particular subject areas will include kinematics and kinetics of particles, and plane kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 241 and MATH 222.
  
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    PKMT 101 - Forestry


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides the student with a general understanding of forestry and forest management. Emphasis is on tree identification, basic forest management, silvicultural techniques, forest measurements, map and compass, and global positioning systems. PA 130 - Basic Wildland Firefighter and Project Learning Tree training are components of the course.
  
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    PKMT 102 - Recreation Leadership


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of group dynamics in park and recreation management. The emphasis is on the application of group process principles, leadership development, factors influencing team dynamics, and interpersonal skills. Students will apply classroom theory by participating in and leading group activities. Field trip required.
  
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    PKMT 104 - Introduction to Parks and Recreation


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides an overview of the history and philosophy of leisure and recreation, with major emphasis on American society. The course examines roles of government as well as private institutions in providing park and recreation opportunities. Students will explore park and recreation careers and identify skills to obtain employment.
  
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    PKMT 105 - Park Safety and Visitor Services


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course instructs students in basic law enforcement and rescue techniques that apply to park and recreation areas. Specific training includes: swiftwater, ice, advanced line systems rescue, patient packaging and transport. Water rescue certifications may be obtained upon successful completion of certification standard requirements. Field trips and additional class time required. Course meets PA and national program requirements for certification and NFPA 1670 standards.
    Prerequisite(s): PKMT 110 or permission of instructor.
  
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    PKMT 110 - First Aid and Safety


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course instructs the student in first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillation (AED) skills. Emphasis will be towards stabilization of emergency situations by providing basic life support until advanced life support arrives. Upon successful completion of certification requirements, students will be certified in Emergency Response and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. Meets Guidelines 2000 for Emergency Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.
  
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    PKMT 201 - Park Management Practicum


    2 credits (1 lecture, 8 work hours per week)
    This is a supervised work experience designed to allow the student to grow professionally, identify strengths and weaknesses, and apply learned theory to practical situations. The student will gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career.
    Prerequisite(s): PKMT 104.
  
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    PKMT 205 - Interpretive Methods & Programming


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to take the student through the process of developing, creating and presenting interpretive programs. The student will learn how to write lesson plans, operate audiovisual equipment, utilize digital presentation technology, design and construct bulletin boards, and develop an interpretive trail brochure. Field trips are required.
  
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    PKMT 209 - Wildlife Management


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course introduces the concepts involved in the management of wildlife and their related habitat. The student will learn to recognize problems and develop management solutions relevant to maintaining a desirable wildlife population in the Northeastern United States. Project Wild training is also a component of this course.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 or BIOL 103
 

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