Jul 13, 2024  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2023-2024 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2023-2024 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

BIOL 201 - General Microbiology

4 Credits: (3 lecture, 3 lab)

Course Description
This course is a one-semester study of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Concepts include taxonomy, morphology, growth and reproduction, and metabolic biochemistry of the bacteria. The structure of viruses, their modes of replication, control, and diseases they cause will be studied, as well as emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and topics in immunology. Laboratory exercises include culturing, isolating, identifying, and classifying of microorganisms with emphasis on development of good aseptic technique.

Prerequisite BIOL 101 OR BIOL 120; OR both BIOL 131 and BIOL 132.


Text
Chess, B., & Talaro, K. P. (2024). Foundations in microbiology w/Connect (12th ed.) New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

Szuminsky, N. (2023). Microbiology - methods and applications revised (7th ed.).

Objectives
The student will be able to:

A. Recognize the positions microorganisms occupy in the biological world.

B. Differentiate similarities and differences of microbes compared to higher forms of life from both structural and functional standpoints.

C. Explain how the microbe reproduces and how this knowledge has lead to and is used in the biotechnology revolution.

D. Demonstrate proficiency in the methods involved in the cultivation and identification of microorganisms and assess problems encountered in these procedures.

E. Describe the means by which microorganisms cause disease and the mechanisms of host defense against infectious disease.

F. Critically evaluate the methods available to control microorganisms including antiseptics, disinfectants, and antibiotics.

Content
A. The scope, history, and advances of microbiology

B. Classification of microbes and survey of the microbial world

C. Techniques used in the observation of microbes

D. Techniques used in the cultivation and identification of microbes

E. Microbial growth, metabolism, and genetics

A. The scope, history, and advances of microbiology

B. Classification of microbes and survey of the microbial world

C. Techniques used in the observation of microbes

D. Techniques used in the cultivation and identification of microbes

E. Microbial growth, metabolism, and genetics

F. Physical and chemical methods of microbial control

G. Survey of viruses, fungi, and protozoa

H. Principles of immunology

I. Microorganisms and disease

Student Evaluation
Classroom assessment consists of a mixture of subjective exams, individual project, and analysis of case studies. Laboratory assessment consists of weekly laboratory assignments, weekly laboratory quizzes, and an independent research project with both a written and an oral report.

Bibliography
Atlas, R. M. (2010). Handbook of microbiological media (4th ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

Balows, A. & American Society for Microbiology (Eds.) (1991). Manual of clinical microbiology (5th ed.)Washington, D.C: American Society for Microbiology.

Bennett, J. E., Dolin, R., & Blaser, M. J. (Eds.) (2020).Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett’s principles and practice of infectious diseases. New York, NY: Elsevier.

Dixon, B. (1994). Power unseen: How microbes rule the world. New York, NY: W. H. Freeman.

Dusenbery, D. B. (1996). Life at small scale: The behavior of microbes. New York, NY: Scientific American Library: Distributed by W. H. Freeman.

Heritage, J., Evans, E. G. V., & Killington, R. A. (1999). Microbiology in action. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lederberg, J. (Ed.). Encyclopedia of microbiology (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

McClane, B.A. & Mietzner, T. A. (1999). Microbial pathogenesis: A principles-oriented approach (1st ed.). Fence Creek Pub.; Distributors, U.S. and Canada, Blackwell Science.

Salyers, A. A. and Whitt, D. D. (2001). Microbiology: Diversity, disease, and the environment. Bethesda, MD: Fitzgerald Science Press.

Yount, L. (2004). Biotechnology and genetic engineering (Rev. ed.) Facts on File.