Nov 29, 2022  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2014-2015 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ACCT 110 - Accounting for Managers


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to familiarize business and management majors with the basic elements of a financial accounting system. Emphasis will be placed on reading, understanding, and using accounting information to make economic business decisions. This course cannot be used as an elective in any associate degree business program.
    Corequisite or Prerequisite: Math requirement for student’s declared program.
  
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    ACCT 203 - Financial Accounting


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of accounting concepts that govern the process of identifying, recording, and reporting accounting information. The analysis of financial information and role of the financial statements in the decision making process is emphasized. 
    Corequisite or Prerequisite: Math requirement for student’s declared program.
  
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    ACCT 213 - Income Taxation


    3 credits (3 lecture)

    The course is designed to provide an overview of income tax laws and the detailed provisions that most individuals will encounter in their personal lives. The course emphasis is on the understanding and application of tax law provisions as opposed to the theoretical approach.

  
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    ACCT 221 - Computerized Accounting I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course enables the student to maintain accounting records and produce reports employing a computerized accounting program that is used commercially by small- to medium-sized businesses. While an understanding of manual accounting is required, the course assumes that the student has never used a computerized accounting system and does not possess an extensive knowledge of personal computers or the Windows operating system.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 210 or OADM 107 or permission of the instructor; and either ACCT 110 or ACCT 203.
  
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    ACCT 222 - Computerized Accounting II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a continued study of computerized accounting software programs used by small-to large-sized businesses. The student will be introduced to the processing and operational differences of two additional commercial-level accounting software applications. The student must possess an understanding of the accounting cycle and an operational knowledge of the computerized accounting software introduced in Computerized Accounting I.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 221.
  
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    ACCT 231 - Payroll Accounting


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a comprehensive knowledge of a payroll system. This includes not only the calculation of the payroll and the payroll taxes but also the preparation of the records and reports that form the foundation of an efficient payroll system. Course work includes hands-on experience using computerized payroll software.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 110 or ACCT 203
  
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    ACCT 234 - Managerial Accounting


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides an introduction to accounting within the context of business and business decisions. Students will explore accounting information’s role in the decision-making process and learn how to use accounting information in a variety of management decision situations.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 203
  
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    AHEA 105 - Introduction to Health Administration


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses on the structure of health care administration. Topics include an overview of the U.S. health care systems, administration of health services, managerial roles, functions of health service organizations, and risk management.
  
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    AHEA 110 - Medical Law and Ethics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of medical ethics and law. The student will gain a knowledge of law, medical ethics, and bioethics as they impact current health care practices. Special emphasis will be placed on documentation; types of consent; standard of care; physician-patient relationship; licensure and accreditation; and professional liability and malpractice. 
  
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    AHEA 125 - Basic Human Structure


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is a study of basic human anatomy for the medical assistant, medical secretary, therapeutic recreation, or other allied health student. Although aspects of physiology are necessarily included, the major emphasis is on human structure. Organ systems studied include the skeleton, muscles, reproduction, digestion, circulation, respiration, nervous system, and excretory function.
  
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    AHEA 126 - Electronic Health Records


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to introduce electronic health records usage within an ambulatory setting. Topics include vendor selection, system implementation, administrative and clinical usages of electronic health records (EHR). Upon completion of this course, students are eligible for the Certified Electronic Health Record Specialist (CEHRS) exam offered through the National Health Career Association.
    Prerequisite(s): COMP 210 or OADM 107 and AHEA 280
  
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    AHEA 127 - Insurance & Reimbursement Methods


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses on principles of medical insurance and claims reimbursement. Topics include appropriate reimbursement procedures, claims processing, coordination of insurance benefits, and legal processing issues. The course will integrate the use of electronic claims submission, the appeals process, and documentation requirements.
    Prerequisite(s): AHEA 218
  
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    AHEA 140 - Medical Office Procedures


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is designed to prepare the student for the administrative competencies required for entry-level front office employment in an ambulatory healthcare setting. Topics include clerical, operational, and bookkeeping functions; establishing and maintaining the medical record; performing routine medical office administrative procedures; and utilizing computer software to maintain office systems.
    Prerequisite(s): AHEA 280
  
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    AHEA 145 - Medical Coding and Billing Specialist Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    Students enrolled in the Medical Coding Specialist Certificate program will apply coding/billing principles in a health care setting. During the 165 hour site experience, students will gain experience in diagnostic and procedural coding systems, insurance reimbursement and related activities.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 32 credits in the program with at least a “C” average and/or permission of the instructor.
  
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    AHEA 218 - Coding I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Diagnosis coding is the language of reporting why a service was medically necessary for patient care. This course is designed to provide the student with the fundamental knowledge of basic coding systems and their diverse applications in the healthcare environment.
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: AHEA 280 and AHEA 125.
  
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    AHEA 219 - Coding II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course focuses on advanced principles of International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10-CM), Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), and an introduction to Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) coding. The course will cover coding guidelines in areas of medical necessity, reimbursement, and claims submission.
    Prerequisite(s): AHEA 218.
  
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    AHEA 220 - Study of the Disease Process


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to introduce students to pathology and the study of disease. The course focuses on organ system pathophysiology with a review of normal anatomy and physiology and examination of the etiology, clinical features, and treatment of major diseases affecting each system.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 115/AHEA 125, or BIOL 131 and BIOL 132, or BIOL 131 and permission of the instructor.
  
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    AHEA 225 - Medical Coding Certification Preparation


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course prepares students to take certification exams offered by professional coding organizations. Students will review medical coding guidelines and examination strategies.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 32 credits in the program with at least a “C” average and permission of the instructor.
  
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    AHEA 280 - Medical Terminology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the formation and usage of general medical terminology as it relates to the major body systems. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to describe and identify basic medical terms; build medical terms from word parts; use medical terms within an appropriate context; and accurately pronounce and spell words used in the medical language system.
  
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    ANTH 100 - Introduction to Anthropology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course deals with the origin, diversification, and evolution of humans and their cultures from extinct primitive systems to modern industrial civilizations. Students will be exposed to the major sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology, archeology, linguistics and cultural anthropology. A primary focus will be the biological and cultural processes that made human beings unique among living organisms.
  
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    ARCH 101 - Introduction to Architecture


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to familiarize the students with the nature of architecture by studying the buildings constructed down through history. Special focus and examination is paid to significant structures; how they were built, how they stand structurally, and how they grew out of the local culture, available materials and technology. The course starts with an overview of structural systems and proceeds with ancient Egypt through the major styles to the present modern masters. Material is presented in a lecture format with occasional slide lectures.   Fall semester only.
  
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    ARCH 102 - Architectural Drawing


    4 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is a continuation of Architectural Graphics. A complete set of drawings is designed and prepared for a residential-type building. Areas of study will include: site analysis, area planning, basic and technical architectural plans, presentation of architectural plans, and creative architectural drafting and design, rendering, and model building, working drawings, sections, details and dimensioning.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 104 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ARCH 104 - Architectural Graphics


    3 credits (2 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is an introduction to drawing using architectural subject matter and common drawing materials and media. Student will study the basics of line and form, light and shadow, line weights, lettering, freehand and perspective drawing and color. Emphasis will be placed on the graphic interpretation of the architectural subject matter such as simple building forms, building context and natural landscape features. Design is emphasized in all projects.  Fall semester only.
  
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    ARCH 201 - Architectural Design I


    5 credits (4 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is a study of theory, including basic observation in architecture, history and master architects. Emphasis is placed on the various design elements and use of media for fundamental creative expression of different compositions. Students will develop and organize space for human use, study structural stability, and prepare working drawings for a small commercial or institutional building.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 102 and ARCH 215 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ARCH 202 - Architectural Design II with AutoDesk® Revit®


    5 credits (4 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is a continuation of Architectural Design I emphasizing coordination of all parts of architectural solutions including aesthetics, specifications, materials, structures, mechanical equipment, structural systems, relationship to the site, execution of drawings, detailing materials, flashing and structural connections and a continuation of Computer-Aided Drafting I. CADD II introduces the student to the advanced features of Revit®. The course provides the student with skills to streamline drawing tasks.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 201 and DRFT 226 and either MATH 118 or PHYS 101, or permission of instructor
  
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    ARCH 208 - Building Systems


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course emphasizes heat transfer, human comfort, climate and shelter, micro-climate design, passive solar, passive cooling and natural ventilation, HVAC design with Trane software, natural day-lighting design and electric lighting design.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 215 and MATH 117 or MATH 101 or permission of instructor
  
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    ARCH 215 - Architectural Materials and Construction I


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course will emphasize building materials, their composition and strength, and how they are structurally used in buildings. Topics presented include zoning and building codes, contracts, soil exploration, site preparation, footings and foundations, retaining walls, site and building drainage, concrete, masonry, steel, wood, glass, plastics, insulation, roofing, doors and windows.  Spring semester only.
  
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    ARCH 216 - Architectural Materials and Construction II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will emphasize building and zoning codes, construction contracts and specifications, estimating, scheduling, and professional practice. Topics include analysis of building projects for code compliance, legal construction contracts, drafting specifications for buildings, cost estimates based on building projects, and construction scheduling of a building.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 215
  
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    ARTS 101 - Introduction to Art


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a survey of contemporary and past arts intended to develop visual discrimination and appreciation of art forms.
  
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    ARTS 102 - Drawing


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed for all students interested in bettering their drawing skills. Classes are geared to the needs of each student individually.
  
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    ARTS 104 - History of Art I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a chronological survey of the paintings, sculpture, and architecture of major civilizations of the past, including the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, the Early Christian world, Byzantium, and Medieval Europe.
  
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    ARTS 105 - History of Art II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a chronological survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture beginning with the European Renaissance and ending with the Post-Modern era in Europe and America.
  
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    ARTS 110 - Sculpture


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is a comprehensive introduction to the principles of design as they are related to sculpture. Application of these topics will be explored along with their influence on and relationship to fine art, architecture, and interior design. The format of the class will include lecture and extensive studio work.
  
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    ARTS 112 - Introduction to Theater


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to theatre intended to increase understanding, appreciation, and critical perceptions of the theatrical event. Readings, activities, and lectures focus on the elements of theatrical practice, artists and innovators of theatre throughout history and the theatre’s development as an art form and social phenomenon.
  
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    ARTS 114 - Introduction to Painting


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides an introduction to the materials, processes, and discipline required to create paintings. It will explore the medium of acrylic and oil paints through the use of different techniques and approaches to materials. The classroom will be expanded by museum trips, film/videos, slide lectures and demonstrations.
  
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    ARTS 120 - Technical Theater Production


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will introduce the fundamentals of theatrical lighting, sound, and staging elements. Students will have an opportunity for hands-on backstage experience during performing arts events at the Succop Theater. Students will be required to assist with productions evenings and weekends in addition to class time.
  
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    ARTS 161 - Technical Theater Workshop


    1 credits (15 lecture, plus productions at Succop Theater)
    This workshop will introduce the student to the fundamentals of theatrical lighting, sound, and staging elements. The student will have an opportunity for hands on backstage experience during professional productions at the Succop Theater. The students will be required to assist with productions evenings and weekends in addition to class time.
  
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    ARTS 162 - Production Design Workshop


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This workshop will allow the student to participate in the planning and design of a play, musical, or operetta to be performed in the subsequent semester. Students may need to participate in some class activities during evenings or weekends.
  
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    ARTS 163 - Production Performance Workshop


    1 credits (15 lecture)
    This workshop will allow the student to participate in the production and performance of a play or operetta. The students will be required to spend evenings and weekends in technical rehearsal and performance.
  
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    BIOL 101 - Biology I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)

    This course examines life on Earth using the principles of biochemistry, cytology, genetics, and evolution. Emphasis is placed on the processes that determine life. A required laboratory component provides activities and experiments that investigate the concepts from the lecture component. Not to be taken for credit by biology majors.
    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 based on placement test scores; or Cs or better in ENGL 029 or ENGL 030 and/or ENGL 034 or ENGL 035, as required; or transfer credits meeting or surpassing ENGL 101 prerequisites.

  
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    BIOL 102 - Biology II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This is a course for non-majors that examines the unity and diversity of life on Earth using the principles of evolution and ecology. Emphasis is placed on the adaptations to the physical and living environments that characterize the major groups of living organism. Not to be taken for credit by biology majors.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 103 - Environmental Biology


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This non-majors course is an introductory-level study of organisms and their environment, utilizing practical examples of local plant and animal species. Ecological principles and their application to contemporary environmental problems will be given consideration in both lecture and field work. The laboratory includes both field and laboratory experience.

     
    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 based on placement test scores; or Cs or better in ENGL 029 or ENGL 030 and/or ENGL 034 or ENGL 035, as required; or transfer credits meeting or surpassing ENGL 101 prerequisites.

  
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    BIOL 115 - Basic Human Structure


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is a study of basic human anatomy for the medical secretary, therapeutic recreation, medical assistant, or other allied health student. Although aspects of physiology are necessarily included, the major emphasis is on human structure. Organ systems studied include the skeleton, muscles, reproduction, digestion, circulation, respiration, nervous system, and excretory function.
  
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    BIOL 120 - Principles of Biology I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This is the first course in a two-course sequence intended for biology majors or those students intent upon pursuing a degree in medicine or a medically-related field. The course encompasses the principles of biochemistry, cell metabolism, cell structure, cellular reproduction, Mendelian genetics, and gene function.

     
    Corerequisite(s): Concurrent registration in CHEM 101 and MATH 101 or equivalent.


    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 based on placement test scores; or Cs or better in ENGL 029 or ENGL 030 and/or ENGL 034 or ENGL 035, as required; or transfer credits meeting or surpassing ENGL 101 prerequisites.

  
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    BIOL 121 - Principles of Biology II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This is the second course of a two course sequence intended for biology majors. It covers the principles of evolution and ecology as they apply to the unity and diversity of life on earth. Content areas will include mechanisms of evolution, an overview of biological diversity, plant and animal form and function and ecology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.
  
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    BIOL 131 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This is the first course in a two-course sequence that investigates cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body. The focus of this course is on the organization of the body and the integumentary, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Metabolism and acid-base balance are also discussed.  Dissection is required.

     
    Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 based on placement test scores; or Cs or better in ENGL 029 or ENGL 030 and/or ENGL 034 or ENGL 035, as required; or transfer credits meeting or surpassing ENGL 101 prerequisites.

  
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    BIOL 132 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This is the second course in a two-course sequence that investigates cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the mammalian body. The focus of this course is on the nervous, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems. Dissection is required.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 131.
  
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    BIOL 201 - General Microbiology


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is a one-semester study of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Concepts include taxonomy, morphology, growth and reproduction, and metabolic biochemistry of the bacteria. The structure of viruses, their modes of replication, control, and diseases they cause will be studied, as well as emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and topics in immunology. Laboratory exercises include culturing, isolating, identifying, and classifying of microorganisms with emphasis on development of good aseptic technique.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 101 OR BIOL 120; OR both BIOL 131 and BIOL 132
  
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    BIOL 203 - Zoology


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course deals with the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and economic importance of representative phyla of the animal kingdom. A phylogenetic sequence is followed to show interrelationships among the phyla.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 205 - Botany


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is designed for biology majors. Course content includes the morphology, anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of major plant groups. Representatives of the algae, fungi, bryophytes and vascular plants are studied in detail. The importance and use of plants in the fields of medicine, genetic engineering and biotechnology will be introduced. Representative specimens of the local flora will be collected and identified.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 or permission of instructor
  
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    BIOL 207 - Ecology


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    Topics in this course include physiological, population, community, ecosystem, and behavioral ecology. Evolution and aspects of environmental biology will also be covered. Current models of evolutionary and ecological principles are examined as they pertain to the biological world. The laboratory experience is a combination of lab work and field experiences coupled with literature review. This is a course for biology majors and other interested students who satisfy the prerequisite. 
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 209 - Genetics


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is designed for biology majors or those entering the medical field. Classical (Mendelian) and modern (molecular) explanations of patterns of inheritance are discussed. Topics include nucleic acid structure; replication; transcription; translation; organization and regulation of the prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and viral genomes; evolutionary genetics; and applications of genetic technology in research and medicine.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 219 - Current Topics in Biology


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    Intended for biology majors, but also open to non-majors who meet the prerequisites, this course provides students with opportunities to investigate three or four of the most active research areas in biology through journal readings and guest presentations. Fields from which topics are drawn could include (but are not limited to) nanotechnology, biotechnology, epidemiology, ethnobotany, immunology, evolution, and behavioral genetics.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 or BIOL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BUSN 102 - Business Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides an introduction to law and the judicial system as it functions in a democratic society. Topics of law covered include: function of courts, litigation, contracts, torts, product and service liability, consumer and worker protection, liability of businesses and other selected topics.
  
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    BUSN 113 - Salesmanship


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to sales management philosophy and techniques. Emphasis will be placed upon the verbal and nonverbal interaction between sales agent and the client. Topics to be covered will include agent-client communication, typical communication barriers, and the various means used to overcome those barriers.
  
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    BUSN 121 - Business Mathematics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course develops the student’s informational and computational knowledge and skills. The course will focus on the fundamental mathematical techniques used in accounting, banking, finance and merchandising.

    Presrequisite: Satisfactory score on college math placement exam or completion of Preparatory Math with a “C” grade or better.

  
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    BUSN 123 - Principles of Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of the various functions of management including planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Actual business problems and solutions are discussed to make the subject practical and to show how theory is adapted to action.
  
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    BUSN 124 - Employment Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of employment law and discriminatory practices inherent to all areas of employment. The legal procedures for recruiting, hiring, promoting, evaluating, using progressive discipline, and dismissing employees will be emphasized. Antidiscrimination laws, company policies and their relationship to the protected classes will be researched and discussed.
  
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    BUSN 125 - Human Resource Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the various aspects of personnel management. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as: motivation, supervision, communication, promotion, performance appraisals, interviews, selection process, and job satisfaction.
  
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    BUSN 127 - Customer Service


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This broad-based course covers issues facing customer service providers and managers. Emphasis is placed on the importance of striving for excellence in customer service. Topics covered include problem solving, coping with challenging customers, and customer service strategies for both traditional and virtual businesses.
  
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    BUSN 128 - Staffing Organizations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the process of acquiring, deploying and retaining a workforce of sufficient quantity and quality to create positive impacts on the organization’s effectiveness. Emphasis will be placed on designing and managing successful processes, while dealing with environmental challenges such as laws, regulations, current labor market, and organizational control. Strategic, technological, legal and practical issues confronting organizations and their staffing systems will be explored.
  
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    BUSN 134 - Advertising


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course introduces the methods and techniques used by advertising personnel and agencies in persuading the public to buy. Topics include market research, selection of media, and evaluation and testing of advertising effectiveness. Theory and practice in writing and designing advertising copy is included.
  
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    BUSN 139 - Business Ethics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the role of ethics in business, and the justification for, and the consequences of, managing individual and corporate behavior from an ethical perspective. Readings in business, philosophy, and political science are included to broaden and enrich course content.
  
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    BUSN 187 - Web Marketing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the student to the process of electronic buying and selling of goods and information. The student will learn what web marketing is, how it is being conducted and managed, its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks. The course acquaints the student with a general understanding of the technology behind web marketing. Students will learn how to navigate the Internet, locate and analyze marketers’ websites, and conduct marketing research online. The creation of a web presence for the purpose of e-commerce is included in the course. While this course is required of certain business majors, web marketing (E-Commerce) is an interdisciplinary topic and should be of interest to current or future managers and professional people who work in the business world.
  
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    BUSN 200 - Labor Relations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with labor relations and collective bargaining theories, as well as, the core issues of contract negotiating. Real world issues will be discussed and students will resolve issues both verbally through classroom discussion and practice labor negotiations through interactive simulations.
  
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    BUSN 203 - Introduction to Business


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introductory study of various aspects of business and society in our economic system dealing with organizations, methods of operation, forms of ownership, functions and problems of management.
  
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    BUSN 210 - Employee Training and Development


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with Human Resource Managerial (HRM) skills in the area of employee training and development. Emphasis will be placed upon interpersonal and organizational communication skills used in human resource departments, interviewing skills, feedback, motivation, change and problem solving as they relate to HR departments and HRM goal attainment. Students will have an opportunity to actively practice desired behaviors in the above areas.
  
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    BUSN 212 - Organization Compensation


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course covers all facets of organizational compensation including benefits. A strategic human resources approach is taken on how to deal with labor contracts and negotiations. Emphasis is placed on providing acceptable and affordable employee compensation. Topics covered include compensation analysis, internal and external environmental influences, pay bases, designing compensation systems, benefit options and cost, executive compensation and non-monetary compensation including flexible work schedule options.
  
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    BUSN 213 - Human Resource Management Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    This course is designed to provide students in the Human Resource Management (HRM) program an opportunity to apply occupational competencies through projects or work experience in an actual business organization supervised by the instructor and/or work-site supervisor. The student will spend 165 practicum hours at a site involving human resource management. Students may be required by their practicum site employer to sign a confidentiality agreement and/or pass a criminal background check.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 credit hours in the program, completion of 15 credits in specific *HR major courses with a 2.5 grade average, and instructor permission required. *BUSN 124, BUSN 128, BUSN 200, BUSN 210, BUSN 212, BUSN 281
  
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    BUSN 214 - Marketing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The basic objectives of this course are to provide the student with a broad introduction to marketing concepts, the role of marketing in the firm and various factors that influence marketing decision making. The course’s main focus is on the Four P’s of Marketing: Product, Price, Place and Promotion.
  
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    BUSN 219 - Business Statistics


    3 credits (3 lecture)

    This course introduces business students to statistics. Emphasis is on the application, interpretation, and presentation of statistics in real world situations. Students will learn why, when, and how to use statistics and statistical data to enhance decision making.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or better in MATH 101.

  
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    BUSN 221 - Business Leadership


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of business leadership development through behavior theory and business practice learning. The balancing of people-and task- related skills necessary for influencing others to get their job done efficiently and effectively will be explored.
  
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    BUSN 232 - Marketing Management Practicum


    4 credits (1 lecture, 11 work hours per week)
    This course will develop occupational competencies through projects or work experience in a business organization supervised by the instructor and/or supervisor. Work placement will be within organizations that provide marketing or retailing experiences.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 credits in the program including 18 credits in the major with a “C” average and instructor permission required.
  
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    BUSN 237 - Consumer Behavior


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides the student with an introduction to the study of the underlying behavioral processes as they affect consumer buying. Topics to be covered include understanding how consumers encounter, choose and consume products.
    Prerequisite(s): BUSN 214
  
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    BUSN 241 - Marketing Research


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course covers the fundamentals of marketing research including the overall marketing research process and the different types of important procedures at each stage of the process, including data collection, sampling and statistical analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): BUSN 214.
  
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    BUSN 244 - Financial Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of basic business financial management.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 110 or ACCT 203.
  
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    BUSN 281 - Human Resource Applications


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with managerial skills in the area of human resources (HR). Emphasis will be placed upon developing analytical, decision-making, conceptual, and communication skills as they relate to human resource management (HRM). Employment issues confronting organizations and their HR departments will be explored. 
    Prerequisite(s): BUSN 125
  
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    CHEM 101 - Chemistry I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course introduces the concept of the atom and its structure, bonding theories, and chemical periodicity. Attention is given to chemical nomenclature and stoichiometric calculations. The behavior of solids, liquids, and gases is presented with an emphasis on problem-solving. This course is intended for students majoring in science, engineering, and related fields.
    Corerequisite(s): MATH 101
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or higher in CHEM 112 or in a high school chemistry course taken within the past five years.
  
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    CHEM 102 - Chemistry II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course stresses the application of chemical principles and solution chemistry. The course includes the study of equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. This course is intended for students majoring in science, engineering, and related fields.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or concurrent registration, and grade of “C” or better in CHEM 101.
  
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    CHEM 103 - Modern Instrumental Methods In Chemical Analysis


    1 credits (1 lecture, 2 lab)
    An introduction to modern instrumental methods in chemical analysis will be conveyed. Emphasis will be on electrochemical analysis, spectrophotometry, and chromatography. The course will develop concepts which are fundamental to measurement systems. Field trips may be required.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM-101 or equivalent
  
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    CHEM 104 - Introduction to Nanotechnology


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    As a fast growing technology, nanotechnology has transformed manufacturing, energy, health care, electronics, cosmetics, clothing, and nearly every area of modern life. Here is a course designed to introduce students to the fascinating details beyond the traditional microscopic realm. Topics include the basic concepts, techniques, and applications of nanotechnology. This course is for both science and non-science majors.  Fall semester only.




     

     
    Prerequisite(s): None

  
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    CHEM 112 - Descriptive Chemistry


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts, procedures, and applications of chemistry to the world in which they live. This course is for non-science majors, pre-nursing students, and those preparing for the sciences.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 091 or concurrent registration.
  
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    CHEM 125 - Forensic Science


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course for non-science majors introduces the student to the basic scientific theory and techniques used in criminal investigation. Topics include crime scene processing; forensic medicine; toxicology and chemistry; and analysis of bodily fluids/DNA, trace/contact evidence, and firearms-related evidence.
  
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    CHEM 221 - Organic Chemistry I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is intended for science majors, engineers, and those in related fields. This course covers the major organic functional groups, the major reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry. Laboratory experiences are used to support and clarify those areas as well as teach general organic techniques.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 102 or permission of instructor.
  
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    CHEM 222 - Organic Chemistry II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I and is intended for science majors, engineers, and those in related fields. The course emphasizes organic reaction mechanism, functional groups, conjugated systems, instrumental analysis, and an introduction to carbohydrate chemistry. Laboratory experiences are used to support and clarify theory discussed in class, as well as unknown analysis via chemical and instrumental methods.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221 or permission of instructor.
  
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    CIVL 101 - Surveying I


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course in a study of surveying: the making of records and recording measurements in the field; making the necessary calculations to determine location, area, and volumes; and plotting measurements and drawing maps.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of high school Algebra and Trigonometry or concurrent registration in MATH 117 or equivalent or permission of instructor
  
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    CIVL 202 - Surveying II with GPS


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course enhances the foundational surveying technics and principals learned in Surveying I by adding state-of-the-art technics in data collection and Geomatics. Students will use electronic distance measurement (EDM) applications to solve practical problems in surveying.   Data collection, field practices, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and instrument care will all be integral parts of this course.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIVL 101
  
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    CIVL 217 - Civil Drafting with CADD/GIS


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is the study and application of traditional and computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) principles and practices used in the field of civil drafting. Topics include basic through advanced concepts and techniques such as leveling, longitude and latitude, map scales, symbols, direction, legal descriptions, plot plans, contours, profiles, site development, highway layout, and cut-and-fills. The course uses CADD software and survey data to give the student exposure to an introduction of advanced topics in civil 3-dimensional (3D) drafting and applications in industry including geographic information systems (GIS).  Fall semester only.

        

     
    Prerequisite(s): DRFT 120 or permission of instructor

  
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    COMM 101 - Introduction to Mass Communication


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the development and operation of the mass media industries. From a historical perspective, it examines their ever-changing relationship to the social, cultural, and political realms of society.
  
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    COMM 102 - Design Organization I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This basic course covers a number of graphic design-related concepts such as design concepts, an understanding of contemporary type design, the principles of typography, paste-ups and mechanicals, four-color separation, and basic studio procedures and materials.
  
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    COMM 103 - Electronically Generated Imaging


    3 credits (3 lecture)

    This course provides the skills necessary to produce stop motion photography film tracks. This type of photography is used in movie special effects.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 101, COMM 102, and COMM 114 or COMM 116.

  
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    COMM 105 - Creative Thinking


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will enable students to develop their creative and critical thinking ability. Through creative activities students will learn to think analytically, identify relationships, spot faulty reasonings, develop creative solutions to problems, improve their memories and set goals.
  
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    COMM 110 - Electronic Art and Design I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Electronic art and design is extensively used in the world of visual communications. This art form allows a variety of special effects to be achieved, as well as the freeness to easily change a layout while maintaining a copy of the original version. This course is designed to help the student integrate the basic principles of graphic design with an electronic art medium, while becoming familiar with the latest in design software.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 102 with a “C” grade or higher and either COMP 210, COMP 242, or permission by instructor and COMM 102.
  
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    COMM 111 - Electronic Art and Design II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This class is a continuation of Electronic Art and Design I. Students will expand their skills at a higher and more professional level of proficiency than was possible in Electronic Art and Design I.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 110 with a “C” grade or higher.
  
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    COMM 112 - Electronic Layout and Design I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This is a basic electronic layout and design course. Students will be applying principles of graphic design learned in Design Organization I as they learn a professional grade layout program.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 102 with a “C” grade or higher and either COMP 210, COMP 242, or permission of instructor.
  
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    COMM 114 - Introduction To Black & White Photography


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is an introduction to basic photography techniques, providing the novice photographer with the skills necessary to take, develop, and print black and white photographs. Although the main focus will be on skill development, a portion of the course will introduce the student to the concept of photography as an art form. Access to a 35 mm camera with manual over ride is required.
  
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    COMM 115 - Photojournalism


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course introduces the student to the visual creative medium of digital presentation. Reporting the news as a photojournalist stresses recognition, development and creation of news photographs, and the skills of the photo editor. The student experiences shooting, developing, printing, and editing in a digital format. A digital camera is required for this course.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 111, COMM 212, and COMM 114 or COMM 116.
  
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    COMM 116 - Introduction to Digital Photography


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the student to the medium of digital photography. Although the main focus will be on skill development, a portion of the course will introduce the student to the concept of photography as an art form. A digital camera is required for this course. Cell phone digital cameras are not acceptable for this course.
  
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    COMM 120 - Professional Digital Photography


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the student to the hybrid darkroom. Students will learn to edit and perfect digital photographs while creating saleable digital images and meeting client requirements in a deadline-based environment.
    Prerequisite(s): COMM 114 or COMM 116. Corequisite: COMM 110.
  
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    COMM 121 - Human Communication Dynamics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an overview of common theories relevant to the study of the communication processes and a basic introduction to the various divisions and research methods within the discipline.
 

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