Nov 29, 2022  
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2014-2015 
    
BC3 Academic Catalog: 2014-2015 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ELEC 245 - Robotics Enabling Technologies


    5 credits (4 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course covers the theory of operation of transducers, sensors, and data acquisition devices and techniques.  Microprocessor-based control of actuators such as stepper motors, dc motors, hydraulic actuators and “muscle wire” as applied to robotics applications is presented.  Physical operation of sensors, computer/transducer interfacing techniques, and processing of acquired data is analyzed, as well as the use of that data in the control of external actuators.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 221 and ELEC 225
  
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    ELEC 250 - Individual Research Project


    2 credits (2 lecture)
    This is a supervised work or research experience which allows the student to grow professionally, to apply learned theory to practical situations, and to gain an appreciation of the roles, duties, responsibilities, and nature of the work that has been chosen as a career. This is a required course for all Electronics majors. The assembling of kits such as those available from Heathkit, Graymark, Radio Shack, etc., are not acceptable research projects.  Project topic must be approved by the professor assigned to the course.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 110, ELEC 221, ELEC 222, ELEC 225, ELEC 240, and 2.0 or higher QPA overall in electronics.
  
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    ELEC 251 - Communications Electronics


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is an introduction to classical analog communication techniques such as AM, FM, PM, SSB and DSB. Modern digital and data communication methods including: fiber optic and satellite communication aspects will be covered.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222 and ELEC 225.
  
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    ELEC 255 - Integration of Robotics Systems


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    Building on the basic principles covered in ELEC 245, the course includes the topics of cooperative/swarming robotic behavior, robot vision concepts, inertial measurement techniques, global positioning systems (GPS), and telemetry techniques. Emphasis will be placed on more complex robotic applications including unmanned ground, sea and aerial vehicles and other contemporary topics.  Spring semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 245
  
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    ELEC 272 - Material, Safety, and Equipment Overview for Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course provides an overview of the materials, safety and equipment issues encountered in the practice of “top down” and “bottom up” nanofabrication. It focuses on safety, environmental and health issues in equipment operation and materials handling as well as on cleanroom protocol. Topics to be covered include: cleanroom operation, OSHA lab standard safety training, health issues, Biosafety Levels (BSL) guidelines, and environmental concerns. Safety issues dealing with nanofabrication equipment, materials, and processing will also be discussed including those pertinent to biological materials, wet benches, thermal processing tools, plasma based equipment, stamping and embossing lithography tools, vacuum systems and pumps, gas delivery systems and toxic substance handling and detection. Specific material handling procedures to be discussed will include corrosive, flammable, and toxic materials, biological materials, carcinogenic materials, DI water, solvents, cleaners, photo resists, developers, metals, acids, and bases.

    The course will also concentrate on safe equipment maintenance and operation. Students will be given an overview of basic nanofabrication materials, equipment and equipment operation. This technical overview and operational introduction to processing equipment and characterization tools will include: chemical processing, furnaces, vacuum based processing (physical vapor deposition equipment, chemical vapor deposition equipment, and dry etching equipment), and lithography as well as scanning probe microscopy (e.g., atomic force microscopy), optical microscope, electron microscopy (e.g., scanning electron microscopy) ellipsometer, nanospec, and profilometer equipment.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 273
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222, ELEC 240, METR 115, CHEM 101

  
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    ELEC 273 - Basic Nanotechnology Processes


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is the hands-on introduction to the processing involved in “top down”, “bottom up”, and hybrid nanofabrication. The majority of the course details a step-by-step description of the equipment, facilities processes and process flow needed to fabricate devices and structures. Students learn to appreciate processing and manufacturing concerns including process control, contamination, yield, and processing interaction. The students design process flows for micro- and nano-scale systems. Students learn the similarities and differences in “top down” and “bottom up” equipment and process flows by undertaking hands-on processing. This hands-on exposure covers basic nanofabrication processes including colloidal chemistry, self assembly, catalyzed nanoparticle growth, lithography, wet and dry etching, physical vapor deposition, and chemical vapor deposition.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 272
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222, ELEC 240, METR 115, CHEM 101
  
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    ELEC 274 - Materials in Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is an in-depth, hands-on exposure to materials fabrication approaches used in nanofabrication. Students learn that these processes can be guided by chemical or physical means or by some combination of these. Hands-on exposure will include self-assembly; colloidal chemistry; atmosphere, low-pressure and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition; sputtering; thermal and electron beam evaporation; nebulization and spin-on techniques. This course is designed to give students hands-on experience in depositing, fabricating and self-assembling a wide variety of materials tailored for their mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, and biological properties.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 282
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 272, ELEC 273
  
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    ELEC 282 - Patterning for Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is a hands-on treatment of all aspects of advanced pattern transfer and pattern transfer equipment including probe techniques; stamping and embossing; e-beam; and optical contact and stepper systems. The course is divided into five major sections. The first section is an overview of all pattern generation processes covering aspects from substrate preparation to tool operation. The second section concentrates on photolithography and examines such topics as mask template, and mold generation. Chemical makeup of resists will be discussed including polymers, solvents, sensitizers, and additives. The role or dyes and antireflective coatings will be discussed. In addition, critical dimension (CD) control and profile control of resists will be investigated. The third section will discuss the particle beam lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography. The fourth section covers probe pattern generation and the fifth section explores embossing lithography, step-and-flash, stamp lithography, and self assembled lithography.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 274
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 272, ELEC 273
  
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    ELEC 283 - Materials Modification in Nanotechnology


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course will cover in detail the processing techniques and specialty hardware used in modifying properties in nanofabrication. Material modification steps to be covered will include etching, functionalization, alloying, stress control and doping. Avoiding unintentional materials modification will also be covered including such topics as use of diffusion barriers, encapsulation, electromigration control, corrosion control, wettability, stress control, and adhesion. Hands-on materials modification and subsequent characterization will be undertaken.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 284
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 274, ELEC 282
  
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    ELEC 284 - Characterization, Testing of Nanotechnology Structures and Materials


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course examines a variety of techniques and measurements essential for testing and for controlling material fabrication and final device performance. Characterization includes electrical, optical, physical, and chemical approaches. The characterization experience will include hands-on use of tools such as the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), fluorescence microscopes, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.
    Corerequisite(s): ELEC 283
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 274, ELEC 282
  
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    ELEC 291 - Linear Circuit Analysis


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This relatively theoretically oriented course introduces linear circuit analysis techniques for circuits containing dependent sources. Function-oriented signal analysis, La Place transform applications, the complex frequency domain, pole-zero analysis, and system transfer functions are heavily stressed. Computer aided circuit analysis and design using PSpice is included.
    Prerequisite(s): ELEC 222 or PHYS 222 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 029 - Developmental Reading


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is designed for students requiring in-depth reading skill development and review. Its focus is intensive practice and reinforcement of essential comprehension skills. Vocabulary skills, study skills, and test-taking strategies will be taught.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 029 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 030 - Preparatory Reading


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed for students requiring reading skill development and review. Reading skills will be strengthened and new comprehension strategies will be taught. Instruction in vocabulary skills, study skills, and test-taking strategies will be included.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 030 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 034 - Developmental English


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course is designed for the student requiring in-depth skill review, emphasizing the writing process and sentence-level competencies. In preparation for English I, the student will engage in intensive study of grammar, sentence construction, punctuation, and paragraph/essay development within various contexts, including his/her individual writing.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 034 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 035 - Preparatory English


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is designed for students requiring skill review in preparation for English I. Emphasis is placed upon the overall writing process: pre-writing, writing, rewriting. The student will study grammar, sentence construction, spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary within the context of individual writing.
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better of all students enrolled in ENGL 035 is a prerequisite for ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 101 - College Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course stresses the writing process of planning, organizing, drafting, revising, and editing multi-paragraph essays. Methods of invention, types of development, and the mechanics of effective academic composition are included as well as discussion of plagiarism and source documentation.
    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on college placement test or completion of ENGL 034 or ENGL 035 and/or completion of ENGL 029 or ENGL 030.
  
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    ENGL 102 - Research Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The emphasis of this course is upon persuasion, evaluation, research, and writing the research paper. Students will continue the study and writing of thoughtful and organized expositions as well as careful editing of grammar and sentences. Word processing sections are available.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 104 - Literary Research Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The emphasis of this course is upon literary analysis, focused on the standard literary genres and on the process of writing a research paper on a literary topic. Students will continue the study of writing thoughtful and organized expositions as well as careful editing and grammar and sentences.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 106 - Technical Writing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of technical communications, both written and oral, with emphasis on the practical applications of accurate and appropriate documentation such as memoranda, instructions, reports and proposals.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
  
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    ENGL 110 - Workplace Communications


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will emphasize the written and oral communication formats typical in business and industry. This course will also provide an introduction to the uses of electronic and visual communications used in workplace settings.
    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on College placement test or completion of ENGL 034 or ENGL 035 and/or completion of ENGL 029 or ENGL 030.
  
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    ENGL 145 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will focus on developing imaginative writing for those who have the desire or talent to write poetry. Ultimately, students will strive for writings of publishable quality, either within the institution or in the public market.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 180 - Film Analysis


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course investigates film as an art form in its historic, aesthetic, philosophic, and technical aspects in order to help the student read, appreciate and analyze this contemporary medium of expression.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of professor.
  
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    ENGL 201 - American Literature: Colonial and Romantic


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course the student will read works of representative American authors from colonial times to the Civil War. The course explores American literature’s diverse aesthetic and cultural traditions.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 203 - Shakespeare


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course includes a study of selected plays of William Shakespeare. Primary focus is placed on texts and performances. Secondary focus is placed on the author’s life and times.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 204 - Modern Drama


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an examination of the development of modern drama as literature from Ibsen to contemporary dramatists. This is not a performance course.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 206 - American Literature: Realistic and Modern


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    A survey of representative American authors from the end of the Civil War to the present, this course explores the continuing genesis and development of American literature’s diverse aesthetic and cultural traditions.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 207 - Classical Mythology


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the mythology of classical antiquity with emphasis on recognized masterpieces of literature by authors such as, Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 209 - English Literature Before 1798


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a survey of the writings of English authors from Anglo-Saxon times to 1798, with the principal emphasis upon recognized masterpieces of literature.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 210 - 19th & 20th Century English Literature


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a survey of the writing of English authors from 1798 through the 20th century, with the principal emphasis upon recognized masterpieces of literature.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 211 - The Novel


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of the novel in its cultural, historical, structural, psychological, political, philosophical, literary, and linguistic contexts. The course will emphasize contemporary literary theory in an investigation of the novel as an art form that reflects and illuminates the human condition.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 214 - Introduction to Fiction


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course investigates the short story, the novella, and the novel. A variety of selections will be studied to highlight literary development along with focusing on historic, cultural, structural, psychological, political, philosophic, and linguistic contexts by applying contemporary literary theory to the texts.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 215 - The Bible as Literature


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    A thematic approach to the study of the Bible, this course includes selections from the Old Testament, Apocrypha, and New Testaments emphasizing the Bible as a literary work.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 216 - World Literature: Ancient Through Early Modern


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of world literature from the ancient world through the early Renaissance, emphasizing Western and Non-Western literary and cultural traditions. The course encourages awareness of a global environment through exploration of selected works including poetry, prose, and drama.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 217 - World Literature: Renaissance Through The Present


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Beginning in the Renaissance and progressing through the twentieth century, this course explores both Western and Non-Western literary and cultural traditions. The course encourages awareness of a global environment through exploration of selected works in various genres including poetry, prose, and drama.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGL 220 - Detective Fiction


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course the student will read, discuss, and write about detective stories and novels from the nineteeth century to the present. The three principle types of detectives and genres of detective fiction will be included: amteur sleuths and puzzle stories, private investigators and hardboiled stories, and police investigators and police procedural stories.
    Prerequisite(s): English 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 225 - Survey of Poetry


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    A study of poetry, its structure, styles, movements, devices, techniques, and interpretations, the course includes poetry from traditional to modern, primarily English and American.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 235 - Literature and the Arts


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Literature and the Arts is a chronological study of the influences of Western literature on other art forms, especially music and graphic arts. The course will focus on major trends in the four culture-epochs, Greco-Roman, Middle Ages, Renaissance and Twentieth Century through a sampling of literature, musical selections, and art work.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
  
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    FIRE 101 - Introduction to Fire Sciences


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course provides a history of the fire service in the United States, as its primary focus. Because of the many facets involved in firefighting, the student is encouraged to relate the progress of firefighting from early colonial days, starting with Ben Franklin, through current technology, to future aspects for the fire service.
  
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    FIRE 102 - Introduction to Fire Suppression


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is an introduction to the physical nature of fire behavior. The course will examine the basic reactions that occur to cause ignition of substances. In addition to learning about the nature of burning materials, the student will learn to identify fire hazards. An introduction to fire suppression methods will be included. Fire prevention is also reinforced to the participant.
    Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Fire Science or permission of instructor or dean.
  
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    FIRE 103 - Introduction to Fire Apparatus


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a brief history of the earliest fire units to modern designs. Study of specific uses, new design developments and the requirements for specific apparatus will lead the student to be able to develop specifications for the purchase of fire apparatus. Investigation and examination of components, including chassis, cab, pumps, custom bodywork and aerial devices, will be explored. The student will participate in design specification sessions and will have the opportunity to review features that may be pertinent to particular apparatus or regional idiosyncrasies.
    Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Fire Science or permission of instructor or dean.
  
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    FREN 101 - French I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The beginning College French course is a functional one which includes the fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in correct idiomatic French. Selected cultural material is used to enhance basic skills.
  
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    FREN 102 - French II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The beginning College French course is a functional one which includes the fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in correct idiomatic French. Selected cultural material is used to enhance basic skills. The second semester will expand fundamentals and improve proficiency in the rudiments of French.
    Prerequisite(s): One year of high school French, FREN 101, or permission of instructor.
  
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    FREN 201 - French III


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a review of the four basic skills of French through written and oral work. In addition, vocabulary peculiarities and idioms, grammatical problems, and a study of current French events and cultural ramifications are included. Class and individual work will be stressed to achieve greater fluency in comprehension, speaking, and writing.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102 or permission of instructor.
  
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    FREN 202 - French IV


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a review of the four basic skills of French through written and oral work. In addition, vocabulary peculiarities and idioms, grammatical problems, and a study of current French events and cultural ramifications are included. Class and individual work will be stressed to achieve greater fluency in comprehension, speaking, and writing.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 201 or permission of instructor.
  
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    FSVC 110 - Hospitality Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)

    This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the principles, concepts, and functions of management in a hospitality operation.  It is a study of the overview of the hospitality industry from a profile of its historical development to its three principal areas—the food and beverage segment, the lodging segment, and travel and tourism.  It will provide the student with a clear understanding of career opportunities available within the hospitality industry.

  
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    FSVC 115 - Commercial Food Analysis


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course uses a practical management approach to the terms, technique and principles of food preparation. Lectures and discussions will concentrate on the development of basic food preparation skills, learning the scientific principles relating to various food handling, the economics and organizational aspects of food preparation and factors affecting the evaluations of different foodstuffs. The principles of food preparation covered in class will be analyzed in a laboratory environment.
  
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    FSVC 120 - Special Events Planning


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The focus of this course is special-events planning with an emphasis on the following: design basics, room configurations, event flow, entertainment, and concessions. Also, communication skills necessary for special-event planning venues including festivals, galas, fairs, sporting events, weddings, and reunions are examined.
  
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    FSVC 121 - Baking Essentials


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course explores the fundamentals of baking and focuses on the ingredients and techniques employed in the production of quality baked goods and dessert specialties. In lab, a variety of baked products are produced utilizing both scratch and convenience techniques.  
  
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    FSVC 126 - Sanitation Certification


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to food and environmental sanitation and safety in a food production area. Attention is focused on food borne illnesses, their origins and on ways to apply sanitary principles in practical situations as well as methods for training employees to follow good sanitation practices. HACCP principles are emphasized. The course meets and exceeds FDA recommendations on content for sanitation.
  
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    FSVC 127 - Hospitality and Travel Marketing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course covers the marketing and sales techniques specifically related to the hospitality industry including marketing research; the marketing mix; and the role of communication, advertising, promotion, and public relations.
  
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    FSVC 128 - Customer Relations for the Hospitality Industry


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Exceptional customer relations are paramount for success in the foodservice, lodging, and tourism industries. This course is designed to provide students with the basic principles involved in delivering superior guest services. Selected topics include proper service techniques for foodservice establishments, dealing with front desk concerns in lodging, and managing dissatisfied customers within the hospitality environment.
  
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    FSVC 135 - Events Management


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is an introduction to the exciting field of meetings and events management. The course is taught from the perspective of a meeting planner, event planner, and a facility manager. The relationship between these roles is explored by way of the text, discussion, and guest lecturer(s).
  
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    FSVC 140 - Principles of Nutrition


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the principles and practices of basic normal nutrition which contribute to total wellness. Fundamentals include nutrients, digestion, absorption, metabolism, and dietary recommendations. Selected nutrition topics are nutrition over the life cycle; weight management and exercise; nutrition and health; nutrition labeling; menu planning; and developing healthy recipes.
  
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    FSVC 142 - Diet Therapy


    4 credits (4 lecture)
    This course explores the nutrition care process in healthcare facilities. Topics to be covered include nutritional assessment, computer diet analysis, care plans, calculating diets, planning medical nutrition therapy, enteral feedings’ calculations, documentation, regulations, quality assurance issues, and nutrition counseling methods.
    Prerequisite(s): FSVC 140.
  
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    FSVC 201 - Quantity Food Production


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course introduces students to quantity food equipment and techniques through lecture and demonstration. The student will practice specific recipes based on theories, guidelines, and general procedures applicable to a defined category of foods and/or cooking methods.
  
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    FSVC 203 - Food and Beverage Purchasing


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of the management principles of the procurement process. The organization and staffing of a food purchasing department, the establishment of procedures and policies in purchasing quality, quantity foods as well as non-food items and computer-based purchasing systems are discussed. The student will develop an understanding of product knowledge by learning how to identify products required to meet the production need and how to select and procure them in the market.
  
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    FSVC 204 - Hospitality Management Practicum


    4/5 credits (1 lecture, 11 work or 1 lecture, 14 work hours per week)
    This course is designed to aid students in applying the skills necessary for success in the hospitality industry by providing actual supervised work experience in the Hospitality Industry under the guidance of a hospitality manager.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 45 hours in program and 15 hours in the major with a “C” average and/or permission of the instructor.
  
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    FSVC 210 - Hospitality Law


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course provides a general knowledge of the law as it applies to the hospitality industry. Content includes proactive management strategies to ensure compliance with hospitality laws and regulations.
  
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    FSVC 211 - Cultural Cuisines Around the World


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Through lectures and demonstrations students become acquainted with the social, cultural, and economic aspects of food preparation including both International and American Regional cuisines. They will be exposed to a number of interesting culinary specialties and food customs from the world’s diverse cultures.
  
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    FSVC 215 - Lodging Operations


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to provide a systematic approach to understanding the functions of management and its responsibilities in the operations of a hotel or motel.
  
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    FSVC 220 - Catering Management


    3 credits (2 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course develops an understanding of the underlying concepts and management skills necessary for the successful operation of a catering service. It provides an orientation to the field of catering including all the activities associated with the sales, organization, food preparation, and service of catered functions.
    Prerequisite(s): FSVC 201 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    FSVC 230 - Hospitality Cost Control and Analysis


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to examine the need for effective controls in foodservice, beverage, human resources, and hotel operations. It includes consideration of how the control process relates to other management systems and how it fits into the overall management of food and beverage operations. Also included is management examination of procedures assuring that performance standards are met, the means for determining actual operating costs, budget development, and labor control computer applications are explored.
  
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    GENL 101 - College Study Skills (CAPS)


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course provides an opportunity for students to explore a variety of issues related to college success. The course will focus on study skills and personal development and will include the following topics: goal setting, campus resources, note-taking, textbook reading, time management, stress management, test preparation, test taking skills and communication skills.
  
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    GENL 110 - College Success Skills


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course, designed to assist students in the transition to college life, will provide strategies for success including study skills, textbook reading techniques, note taking methods, and stress and time management skills. Students will develop career plans through the implementaion of inventories and assessments, as well as utilization of Internet and software applications. Emphasis is placed on the identification of college resources and policies that can assist students in their academic success. 
  
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    GENL 111 - Job Readiness


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course is designed primarily for second year students who are expecting to enter the workforce and intend to improve their ability to find meaningful employment. Job search strategies and their application will be covered. 
    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 12 earned college credits.
  
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    GENL 115 - Career Planning


    1 credits (1 lecture)
    This course provides information and experiential activities designed to help students narrow their choices for a college major and develop skills necessary for long-range career planning and development. Emphasis will be placed upon assisting students to engage in self-assessment, clarify and formulate realistic career goals, and develop appropriate career plans and strategies to achieve those goals.
  
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    GEOG 101 - World Geography


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines various types of natural environments throughout the world and emphasizes man’s adjustment to them. The interrelationships between physical and cultural factors are studied.
  
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    GRMN 101 - German I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Beginning College German is a functional course which includes fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing in correct idiomatic German. Selected cultural material is used to enhance the basic skills.
  
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    HIST 121 - Ancient History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    A survey of the political, social, and cultural development of (a) the Ancient Middle East, (b) Greece, (c) Rome, (d) the Byzantine Empire, (e) the beginnings of Islam, (f) and the early Middle Ages, the course considers Western Heritage from 3000 B.C. to 800 A.D.
  
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    HIST 122 - Modern European History I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to treat major issues and developments associated with European History from 1300 to 1715. Questions involving the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Age of Absolutism, and the Scientific Revolution will be examined.
  
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    HIST 123 - Modern European History II


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course students will examine issues and developments connected with Modern European History from 1715-1914. Problems of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Age of Reaction and Revolution, the Unification of Italy and Germany, and the causes of World War I will be investigated.
  
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    HIST 150 - American Involvement in Vietnam


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines the events which led to the American involvement in Vietnam as well as the war in Vietnam itself and America’s prolonged withdrawal. The course will also examine the war’s effect on international relations as well as on the home front.
  
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    HIST 201 - Early United States History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will explore the history of the United States to 1865 covering three basic developments in the United States: foundations, growth, and expansion with accompanying problems. Emphasis will be placed on contributions of the various communities which have contributed to our common ground.
  
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    HIST 202 - Recent United States History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    In this course students will explore the social, cultural, and economic growth of America and the political history shaped by these changes. Selected topics including ethnic communities will be emphasized.
  
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    HIST 205 - Twentieth Century World History


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course examines major issues of the Twentieth Century such as the causes and consequences of World Wars I and II, the impact of western imperialism on the emergence of Third World nation states, the development of totalitarianism, the conflicts of the Cold War, and the trend towards increasing global interdependence.
  
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    HIST 215 - Biography and Western Civilization


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Concentrating on the place of people in history, this course is designed to approach the study of the past through the use of biography. The course is interdisciplinary and emphasizes the achievements of prominent people in the arts, business, politics, science, technology, and sports.
  
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    HIST 217 - History of East Asia


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course will focus upon the history of East Asia from early 19th century until the present era covering China, Japan, and Korea. Attentio n will be given to the internal developments of China, Japan, and Korea as well as the struggles imposed by the relentless challenges of the Western World. The value systems which shaped Chinese, Japanese, and Korean life will be highlighted.
  
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    HLTH 115 - Human Sexuality


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    The course is designed to survey a broad range of information about human sexuality from biological, psychological, sociological, religious and medical perspectives.
  
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    HLTH 120 - Health Science


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    Health Science is a course designed to examine the components of life and living while providing the knowledge that enables students to make educated decisions that impact on the potential for an improved healthy lifestyle. This course will provide current information relative to both personal and community health, maximizing healthy lifestyle choices day to day and minimizing the risks of disease and injury.
  
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    HLTH 125 - Motor Behavior


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to study the process of human motor behavior across the lifespan, specifically examining how development of mental and motor abilities affect human movement.
  
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    MACH 111 - Lathe I


    3 credits (1 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is designed to provide the student with basic skills in the use of the metal lathe, its parts and applications. Classroom and laboratory activities will include straight turning, facing, single point threading, turning with stock held in chucks and between centers. Students will turn parts to specification while observing appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: DRFT 114

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills: Turning Operations–turning chucking skills and turning between centers (Machining Level I Standard).

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 112 - Lathe II


    3 credits (1 lecture, 5 lab)
    This course is continuation of LATHE I. LATHE II exposes the student to advanced complex turning on the lathe. Topics covered will include set ups and turning, internal and external threads, knurling, precision boring, face plates, grinding attachments, steady rests, and follow rests. Students will turn parts to specification using appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites:  MACH 111 and MACH 117 or MATH 117

    This course can be completed by obtaining National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Machining Level II Standard certification.

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 117 - Applied Machine Shop Mathematics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to meet the needs of metalworking students with an emphasis on application problems. Topics include operations with real numbers, percents, equations, ratio, proportion, trigonometric functions, geometry, use of the calculator, scientific notation, and measurement.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 091.
  
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    MACH 121 - Grind I


    3 credits (1 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the precision surface grinder, its parts, operation, and basic application. Classroom and laboratory activities include the set up and operation of the surface grinder, wheel selection, surface finishes and grinding fluids. Students will grind parts to specification using appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites:  DRFT 114, MACH 101, MACH 117.

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills: job planning, bench work, and layout and grinding skills (Machining Level I Standard).

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 131 - Mill I


    3 credits (1 lecture, 4 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the milling machine, its parts, operation, and application. Classroom and laboratory activities will include the basic setup and operation of the vertical milling machine, its accessories and attachments, speeds and feeds, metal cutting techniques, drilling and reaming. Students will mill parts to specification using appropriate safety procedures.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: DRFT 114

    This course can be completed by obtaining the following National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) certification skills: job planning, bench work, and layout, drill press skills and Milling I (Machining Level I Standard).


    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

  
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    MACH 132 - Mill II


    3 credits (1 lecture, 5 lab)
    This course is a continuation of MILL I. MILL II exposes the student to complex machining on the vertical mill. Topics covered will include, precision hole location, key seats, rotary tables, dividing head operations, and horizontal boring mill operations.

    Prerequisites:  MACH 131 and MACH 117 or MATH 117

    This course can be completed by obtaining National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Machining Level II Standard certification.

    Butler County Community College does not offer coursework that leads to NIMS certification.

     

  
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    MACH 140 - Metrology with GD & T Inspection


    3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the use of precision instruments for the measurement and Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) inspection of manufactured parts. Classroom and laboratory activities will include the use of measuring instruments, comparators, microscopes, hardness testing instruments, and coordinate measuring machines (CMM). Students will gather and analyze quality assurance data and inspect parts using non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques according to industrial and international standards.

     
    Prerequisite(s): DRFT 120 or DRFT 114 or DRFT 115 and MACH 117 or MATH 101 or MATH 117

  
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    MAST 120 - Medical Laboratory Procedures


    4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab)
    This course introduces the student to medical laboratory tests that are conducted in the ambulatory care environment.  The laboratory component of the course stresses specimen collection and processing, performance of selected tests, proper use of quality control methods, analysis of results, and methods of reporting results. The lecture component stresses the understanding of the biological, physical, and chemical principles underlying the testing methods and test results as they relate to health and disease states.
    Prerequisite(s): AHEA 125 or BIOL 115.
  
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    MAST 131 - Clinical Medical Assisting I


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental aspects of the role of the professional medical assistant (MA) and the basic clinical skill competencies for the ambulatory care setting.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission into the MA Program
  
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    MAST 132 - Clinical Medical Assisting II


    4 credits (3 lecture, 3 lab)
    This course enables the student to perform clinical skill competencies in the ambulatory care setting, comprehend the basics of pathophysiology, perform safety procedures and identify emergency preparedness practices required for the entry-level medical assistant (MA).
    Corerequisite(s): MAST 120 and MAST 133
    Prerequisite(s): MAST 131 and AHEA 125
  
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    MAST 133 - Introduction to Pharmacology


    2 credits (2 lecture)
    This course introduces basic pharmacological principles using a body systems approach; compares and contrasts the classifications of medications; and identifies the desired effects, side effects and adverse reactions of the most commonly prescribed drugs.
    Prerequisite(s): MAST 131 and AHEA 125
  
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    MAST 271 - Medical Assistant Externship


    4 credits (6 lecture hours, 232 externship hours)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the concepts and skills learned in the Medical Asistant (MA) program at affiliated ambulatory clinics or physician offices.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of 24 hours in the program and 12 hours in the major (including MAST 120, MAST 131, MAST 132, and MAST 133) with a “C” or better or with the consent of the Externship Coordinator.
  
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    MATH 081 - Preparatory Mathematics


    3 institutional credits (3 lecture)
    This is a course for students whose basic arithmetic skills are weak. The course covers the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with fractions and decimals. Other topics included are order of operations, prime factorization, ratio and proportion, percent measurement and the metric system, conversions, negative numbers, and transformations in solving linear equations.
    Prerequisite(s): Placement test.
  
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    MATH 091 - Preparatory Algebra


    3 institutional credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed as an introduction to algebra, although it may be appropriate for those needing a review. Topics include properties of numbers, operations with signed numbers, integers as exponents, solving linear equations, polynomials, factoring, and graphing of linear equations.
    Prerequisite(s): Pass MATH 081 with a “C” or better or appropriate score on placement exam.
  
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    MATH 100 - Intermediate Algebra


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is the study of real numbers and operations with polynomials. Other topics include linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations in two variables, solving equations by factoring, exponents, complex numbers, the quadratic formula, and rational equations.
    Prerequisite(s): Pass MATH 091 with a “C” or better or appropriate score on placement test.
  
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    MATH 101 - College Algebra


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of college algebra. Topics in this course include the real number system, exponents and radicals, relations and functions, linear and quadratic functions, inequalities, complex numbers, theory of equations, systems of equations, and the remainder and factor theorems.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
  
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    MATH 102 - Trigonometry and Functions


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of transcendental functions. Topics include exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions and their applications, the laws of sines and cosines, and graphs of the basic trigonometric functions and conic sections.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 101.
  
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    MATH 107 - Elementary Statistics


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is a study of the basic principles and methods of statistics; understanding of and ability to use graphs; frequency distributions; measures of central tendency and dispersion; normal curve; probability; correlation and reliability of statistical measures. This course is appropriate for all areas of study including education, social sciences, sciences, and humanities.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or equivalent.
  
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    MATH 110 - Statistics and SPC


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course introduces the student to the concepts of probability and statistics and their applications. Practical application of statistical process control (SPC) to measurements is discussed. This course is appropriate for students in a technical program.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 101 or MATH 117 or equivalent or permission of instructor
  
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    MATH 117 - Technical Mathematics I


    3 credits (3 lecture)
    This course is designed to meet the needs of technology students with an emphasis on applications. Topics include numerical computation with significant digits, fundamental rules of algebra, right triangle trigonometry, vectors, plane and three-dimensional geometry, oblique triangles, polynomials, graphs and functions, linear equations, systems of linear equations.  Fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 091 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
 

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